The Health News United Kingdom February 17 2018

  • Theresa May’s plans for an “opt-out” organ transplant system will not solve Britain’s long waiting lists for donations, the NHS chief responsible for transplants has said. Claire Williment said there was “no magic formula” to cutting down the tally of 3 people a day who currently die while waiting for a donor organ, and predicted switching to a system of presumed consent may only yield 100 extra donors each year.
  • Research has found that a lack of training for health professionals could be contributing to one thousand two hundred avoidable deaths of people with a learning disability in England each year. A poll of 506 healthcare professionals for Mencap found 23% had never received training on meeting the needs of patients with a learning disability and 45% thought the lack of training may contribute to avoidable deaths.
  • Older people are often assumed to want amiable companionship in later life rather than passion-fuelled romance. But a survey of 2,002 older Brits suggests 52% of over-65s feel they do not have enough sex, and nearly a third are happy to have sex on a first date. It also found one in ten over-75s have had multiple sexual partners since turning 65. The charity Independent Age said its survey showed age was “no barrier to having a sex life”.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 17th of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/02/15/opt-out-organ-donations-wont-solve-waiting-lists-deaths-says/

Theresa May’s plans for an “opt-out” organ transplant system will not solve Britain’s long waiting lists for donations, the NHS chief responsible for transplants has said. Claire Williment said there was “no magic formula” to cutting down the tally of three people a day who currently die while waiting for a donor organ, and predicted switching to a system of presumed consent may only yield one hundred extra donors each year.

The Head of Transplant Development at NHS Blood and Transplant, she said boosting donor rates required a combination of measures including more specialist nurses trained to seek families’ permission as loved-ones die. Wales adopted an opt-out organ donation system in two thousand fifteen and in October last year the Prime Minister announced a consultation examining whether England should follow suit. However, a study published in December revealed Wales has not increased its number of donors since the legal switch.

Recently, one of Britain’s pre-eminent transplant surgeons said there was “no evidence” that opt-out systems work. Approximately six hundred thousand people die in the UK each year but only around one percent – five thousand six hundred eighty one in the year up to March two thousand seventeen – are eligible to donate.

After a sixty three percent consent rate and other factors are taken into account, there were just one thousand four hundred thirteen deceased donors last year. This, however, represents a seventy five per cent increase in organ donation since two thousand seven, with the transplant waiting list gradually shrinking over the last seven years.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/feb/15/training-could-save-lives-1200-learning-disabled-people-mencap-study

Research has found that a lack of training for health professionals could be contributing to one thousand two hundred avoidable deaths of people with a learning disability in England each year. A poll of five hundred six healthcare professionals for Mencap found twenty three percent had never received training on meeting the needs of patients with a learning disability and forty five percent thought the lack of training may contribute to avoidable deaths.

The findings were published on Thursday, a week after a coroner condemned “gross failures” in the care of Richard Handley, who had Down’s syndrome and died from constipation. To prevent such deaths, Mencap, backed by the Royal College of Nursing , is calling on NHS England and the government to ensure that no health professional can set foot in a hospital without receiving training on learning disability.
….
Research published in two thousand thirteen found there were more than three deaths of people with a learning disability every day which could have been prevented by better medical care. Another study, published the same year, found thirty eight percent of people with a learning disability died from avoidable causes, compared with nine percent of the general population. Despite those figures, Mencap says not enough has been done to address the issue.
To coincide with the launch of its Treat Me Well campaign, Mencap also submitted a number of freedom of information requests to hospitals and English universities on the training they provide.

The responses revealed that forty seven percent of hospitals do not include information on learning disability in their induction training for clinical staff, and twenty two percent of universities were found not to include training on making reasonable adjustments to the care of someone with a learning disability in their undergraduate medicine degree. Making such adjustments is a legal obligation under the Equality Act two thousand ten.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43044912

Older people are often assumed to want amiable companionship in later life rather than passion-fuelled romance. But a survey of two thousand two older Brits suggests fifty two percent of over-sixty fives feel they do not have enough sex, and nearly a third are happy to have sex on a first date. It also found one in ten over-seventy fives have had multiple sexual partners since turning sixty five. The charity Independent Age said its survey showed age was “no barrier to having a sex life”.

The survey also found that just one in six people aged eighty and over said they felt they had enough sex, the same proportion of over-sixty fives said one of the only reasons they would stop having sex would be a lack of opportunity and one in four over-sixty fives in a relationship that started in the past ten years said they had met online.
Lucy Harmer, director of services at Independent Age, said a lot of older people were more sexually active than many people might think. She told the BBC: “The generation that is reaching sixty five and older now is the baby boomers. I don’t think anyone has ever told them they should be stopping.”

The poll also highlighted that about one in eleven over-sixty fives said they did not take any precautions against sexually transmitted infections when they started having sex with a new partner. The Terrence Higgins Trust said some older people who were newly single or sexually active later in life had little knowledge about preventing STIs.

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.