The Health News United Kingdom November 18 2017

  • Two new “breakthrough” drugs to treat breast cancer have been given the green light for use on the NHS. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) approved palbociclib and ribociclib after negotiating prices for the treatments. Research shows the drugs slow down advanced cancer for at least 10 months and can delay the need for chemotherapy. Around 8,000 people in England will now have access to the medications.
  • A new study has suggested that feminist theory could be used to treat anorexia. Over a ten-week programme, academics at the University of East Anglia monitored seven patients at a treatment centre in Norwich. During the programme, patients were shown TV adverts, Disney films, news articles and social media in order to spark debate around women’s bodies. Patients covered topics such as “cultural expectations surrounding female emotion and anger” and “cultural prescriptions of femininity”.
  • A new study found that fathers who have depression could influence the mental health of their children. The report from academics at the University College of London found both parents have a role to play in preventing teenage depression after studying 14,000 families from the UK and Ireland. Depressive symptoms can often lead to mothers and fathers becoming more irritable and tired which can cause them to argue with their kids.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 18th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42006609

Two new “breakthrough” drugs to treat breast cancer have been given the green light for use on the NHS. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence or NICE approved palbociclib and ribociclib after negotiating prices for the treatments. Research shows the drugs slow down advanced cancer for at least ten months and can delay the need for chemotherapy. Around eight thousand people in England will now have access to the medications. There are about forty five thousand new diagnoses of breast cancer in the country each year. Palbociclib had earlier been rejected by NICE because of its high cost. One cycle of palbociclib – or twenty one capsules – costs two thousand nine hundred fifty pounds for a pack of twenty one.

Craig Eagle, head of oncology at Pfizer UK, which manufactured palbociclib, told Today the tablet “helps control and slow the cancer for up to two years, bringing that extra time for patients in the prime of their life”. He said it was correct that the company had first offered the drug at a price that was rejected by NICE, but they had later come to a “confidential agreement around the price”. Nicholas Turner, professor of molecular oncology at the Institute of Cancer Research in London, and consultant medical oncologist at the Royal Marsden, said the new drugs were “one of the most important breakthroughs for women with advanced breast cancer in the last two decades”.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/feminism-can-help-treat-anorexia-research-shows-a3693311.html

A new study has suggested that feminist theory could be used to treat anorexia. Over a ten-week programme, academics at the University of East Anglia monitored seven patients at a treatment centre in Norwich. During the programme, patients were shown TV adverts, Disney films, news articles and social media in order to spark debate around women’s bodies.
Patients covered topics such as “cultural expectations surrounding female emotion and anger” and “cultural prescriptions of femininity”. Patients reported that the discussions were helpful for them when it came to tackling their condition.

Published in the journal of Eating Disorders, the paper concluded that the research “offers some support for the idea that focusing on broader gendered discourses – such as those relating to appetite for example – might be productive for participants in thinking about how often unquestioned (and potentially more ‘invisible’) gender inequities may shape the cause and maintenance of an ED [eating disorder].” The paper said that patients found that talking about general topics surrounding appetite and females in society made them feel less likely to blame for their condition. Researchers wrote that using feminism to address eating disorders enabled them to examine how “cultural constructions of femininity” could lead to “body distress”.
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Doctor Susan Holmes, from the university’s department of Art, Media and American Studies, who led the research told the Telegraph: “The medical framework may offer the patient a greater sense of personal agency when it comes to feelings of control in recovery.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/fathers-who-have-depression-could-impact-childrens-mental-health-a3693106.html

A new study found that fathers who have depression could influence the mental health of their children. The report from academics at the University College of London found both parents have a role to play in preventing teenage depression after studying fourteen thousand families from the UK and Ireland. Researcher Doctor Gemma Lewis from University College London, who led the study, told the BBC that because mothers tend to spend more time with their children, it had become a trend to blame mothers for mental health issues. But she said the research showed fathers should also be brought into the picture. She said: “If you’re a father who hasn’t sought treatment for your depression, it could have an impact on your child.
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The study asked children ages seven, nine and thirteen to fourteen years old to fill out a questionnaire about their feelings. Their parents were asked to do the same. The answers from the children and parents were then measured against a depression scale. Results showed that there was a link between depressed fathers and similar symptoms appearing in their children.
The similarity in mental health between father and child was similar to the effect of a mother who has depression. Doctor Lewis said: “Children see the way their parents behave and act and this could bring on negative ways of thinking, which could then lead to depression”. Depressive symptoms can often lead to mothers and fathers becoming more irritable and tired which can cause them to argue with their kids. The study concluded that a father and mother’s influence should be taken into account when tackling depression in adolescents.

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