The Health News United Kingdom October 22 2017

  • Parents drinking in moderation can leave children feeling embarrassed, worried or unrestful, new research shows. The study, undertaken by the Institute of Alcohol Studies shows that three in ten parents admit to having been drunk in front of their children, while half have at least been “tipsy”. The findings provide the first persuasive evidence that even low-level drinking or no more than fourteen units a week, can prove damaging to children.
  • Data from NHS Digital reveals that obesity among children in Year 6 has dropped from 20.4 per cent last year to 19.1 per cent. And 8.6 per cent of children in reception classes in 2016/17 were obese, down from 8.7 per cent the year before. The figures show that Leeds falls below the national and regional averages for both year groups, which have risen when compared with the previous year.
  • British scientists have worked out how many changes it takes to transform a healthy cell into a cancer. The team, at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, showed the answer was a tiny handful, between one and ten mutations depending on the type of tumour. The findings, published in the journal Cell, could improve treatment for patients. The researchers analysed the DNA from seven thousand six hundred and sixty four tumours to find “driver mutations” that allow a cell to be more selfish, aggressive and cancerous.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 22nd of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41644020

Parents drinking in moderation can leave children feeling embarrassed, worried or unrestful, new research shows.

The study, undertaken by the Institute of Alcohol Studies shows that three in ten parents admit to having been drunk in front of their children, while half have at least been “tipsy”.

The findings provide the first persuasive evidence that even low-level drinking or no more than fourteen units a week, can prove damaging to children.

Katherine Brown, the IAS’s chief executive, said: “It is worrying that the majority of parents reported being tipsy or drunk in front of their child.

“All parents strive to do what’s best for their children, but this report has highlighted a troubling gap in their knowledge.

“Parents who have a glass or two of wine in the evening deserve to understand how this might affect their children and the steps they can take to minimise this impact.”

The report, conducted in association with the Alcohol and Families Alliance and Alcohol Focus Scotland, says children who see a parent drunk are less likely to see them as a positive role model.

The Department of Health said it was aware of the effect parental drinking has on children and was considering what measures to take.

“While no one would want to interfere with the right of adults to enjoy a drink responsiblity, we are committed to giving people the information they need to make informed choices about their drinking, which we provide through the UK chief medical officers’ guidelines.”

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/health/childhood-obesity-levels-fall-in-leeds-but-still-remain-high-1-8814196

Childhood obesity levels have fallen in Leeds, however one in five youngsters in the city are obese by the time they leave primary school, new figures show. Data from NHS Digital reveals that obesity among children in Year six has dropped from twenty point four per cent last year to nineteen point one per cent. And eight point six per cent of children in reception classes in twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen were obese, down from eight point seven per cent the year before. The figures show that Leeds falls below the national and regional averages for both year groups, which have risen when compared with the previous year. Nationally nine point six per cent of children in reception classes in twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen were obese, up from nine point three per cent the year before, with a higher percentage of boys obese.

In Yorkshire the figure has risen from nine point four per cent to nine point seven per cent, with Hull coming out worst at thirteen point two per cent, compared to neighbouring East Riding, the lowest in the region at seven point nine per cent. Deprived areas of the country are particularly affected, with more than double the number of obese children compared to more affluent areas.

Doctor Charlotte Evans, associate professor in public health nutrition at the University of Leeds, said: “What we are finding nationally is it paints a worse picture for reception children. We would have expected it to go the other way. It shows the obesity strategy isn’t going far enough and that’s worrying… I’m really hoping this will be a wake-up call and the Government will strengthen the obesity strategy.”

For all children aged ten and eleven in Year six, the final year of primary school, one in five – twenty per cent – are obese nationally, a figure that has remained stable compared to last year.

This picture is reflected in Yorkshire, where twenty point four per cent are obese, compared to twenty point three per cent in twenty fifteen to twenty sixteen. Bradford tops the table, with twenty three point nine per cent obese, and York comes out as the lowest in the region at sixteen per cent…

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41644020

British scientists have worked out how many changes it takes to transform a healthy cell into a cancer.

The team, at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, showed the answer was a tiny handful, between one and ten mutations depending on the type of tumour.

It has been one of the most hotly debated issues in cancer science for decades.

The findings, published in the journal Cell, could improve treatment for patients.

If you played spot the difference between a cancer and healthy tissue, you could find tens of thousands of differences – or mutations – in the DNA.

The researchers analysed the DNA from seven thousand six hundred and sixty four tumours to find “driver mutations” that allow a cell to be more selfish, aggressive and cancerous.

Doctor Peter Campbell, one of the researchers, told the BBC News website: “We’ve known about the genetic basis of cancer for many decades now, but how many mutations are responsible has been incredibly hotly debated.

The researchers were able to pick out the mutations that were driving the growth of cancer by turning to Charles Darwin and evolutionary theory.

In essence, driver mutations should appear more often in tumours than “neutral” mutations that do not make the cell cancerous.

This is because the forces of natural selection give an evolutionary advantage to mutations that help a cell grow and divide more readily.

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