The Health News Australia November 14 2017

  • The terms allergy and food intolerance are often used interchangeably, Professor Mimi Tang, a paediatric allergy expert from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute explains the difference between the two. A food allergy is when someone’s body reacts to a harmless substance with an immune response while a food intolerance doesn’t involve the immune system in the way an allergy does. Rather, it’s when molecules from food react in the body and irritate nerve endings, a bit like a drug side-effect.
  • ABS data released this week as part of the Personal Safety Study (PSS) reveals 16% of Australian women have experienced partner violence.The 2016 PSS was conducted across Australia and surveyed around 21,000 people about their experience of violence.
    The statistics show a mixed picture. Overall, the proportion of Australians who report that they experienced violence in the past year has declined from 8.3% in 2005 to 5.4% in 2016.
  • A trial shows smokers who receive a one-on-one consultation about the symptoms of lung cancer are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease sooner. A new initiative is successfully encouraging those at higher risk of lung cancer to act sooner when symptoms appear. The CHEST Trial involved over 500 Australians who are long term smokers, aged over 55, with a history of heavy smoking, and who are therefore at higher risk of lung cancer.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-11-13/allergy-intolerance-food-sensitivity-whats-the-difference/9133414

The terms allergy and food intolerance are often used interchangeably, but there is a clinical difference between the two. A food allergy is when someone’s body reacts to a harmless substance with an immune response, explains Mimi Tang, paediatric allergy expert from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute. Professor Tang said “It’s the immune system recognising an antigen or molecule and thinking it’s harmful when it’s not”. Mild allergic reactions include facial swelling, hives or welts on the skin, stomach cramps and vomiting. The biggest danger with allergies is the risk of the severe, life-threatening reaction anaphylaxis, which can include breathing difficulties and collapse.

People with allergies that put them at risk of anaphylaxis usually have a management plan that might include carrying an adrenaline auto-injector to treat symptoms that can cause death and brain damage. The foods most likely to cause allergies are peanuts, tree nuts, seafood, egg and milk. While most children grow out of allergies to eggs and milk, allergies to nuts and seafood can be lifelong.

A food intolerance doesn’t involve the immune system in the way an allergy does. Rather, it’s when molecules from food react in the body and irritate nerve endings, a bit like a drug side-effect. An intolerance they can cause a lot of discomfort and inconvenience, with symptoms including migraines, hives, bowel irritation and mouth ulcers.  In other words, people with a certain food intolerance may still be able to enjoy that food — just in smaller amounts or less frequently. It’s worth noting that some food intolerances can look very similar to allergies, because they can target the same system.
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A two thousand sixteen study found that the ABS had recorded three hundred twenty four anaphylactic deaths between nineteen ninety seven and two thousand thirteen, and that the number of deaths had increased over time. Most of those deaths were due to reactions to medication, followed by food and insect stings and bites.Young people were most at risk of severe allergic reactions to food, especially nuts.  Allergies can be diagnosed using a number of tools, including skin prick tests and blood tests.

https://theconversation.com/why-are-rates-of-domestic-violence-in-australia-still-so-high-87187

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data released this week as part of the Personal Safety Study (PSS) reveals sixteen percent of Australian women have experienced partner violence.
The two thousand sixteen PSS was conducted across Australia and surveyed around twenty one thousand people about their experience of violence. The PSS was last run in two thousand twelve, and before that in two thousand five, so it’s possible to make some comparisons across time. The statistics show a mixed picture. Overall, the proportion of Australians who report that they experienced violence in the past year has declined from eight point three in two thousand five to five point four percent in two thousand sixteen. However partner violence remains high, especially towards women.

Around one in six women (sixteen percent or one point five million) have experienced physical violence by a partner, compared with one in seventeen men ( five point nine percent or five hundred twenty eight thousand eight hundred). Women were much more likely to experience physical violence from a previous partner than a current one. Around two point nine percent of women reported violence by a current partner, while around fourteen point six percent of women experienced violence by a previous partner.

In nineteen ninety, Martha Mahoney coined the term “separation assault” in recognition of the phenomenon. Separation is now a well-known risk factor for heightened violence. In government death reviews, actual or intended separation is a characteristic of a high proportion of intimate partner homicides. Risk assessment tools that police and support services use in safety planning now routinely identify separation as a key risk factor for further violence and death.
Notably, while the ABS statistics have remained relatively stable, calls on services have increased significantly over recent years.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/oncology/4/news/aap/new-hope-for-diagnosing-lung-cancer-sooner/3008/

A trial shows smokers who receive a one-on-one consultation about the symptoms of lung cancer are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease sooner. A new initiative is successfully encouraging those at higher risk of lung cancer to act sooner when symptoms appear.
The promising results of the first of its kind trial – to be presented at a oncology conference in Sydney – has raised hopes of improving survival rates for Australia’s biggest cancer killer. Professor Phyllis Butow, President of Clinical Oncology Society of Australia said
“Lung cancer is typically a difficult cancer to treat, but even harder to cure when there is a late diagnosis. Those with lung cancer often take a long time to visit their doctor, sometimes because they feel there is a stigma around chest symptoms when you are a long-term smoker.”

The CHEST Trial involved over five hundred Australians who are long term smokers, aged over fifty five, with a history of heavy smoking, and who are therefore at higher risk of lung cancer. Participants in the trial were given a one-on-one consultation with a research nurse as well as a self-help manual informed by psychological theory, to help them understand what symptoms to look for and promote them seeking help sooner. Researchers tracked which patients visited a GP when they developed respiratory symptoms. The study found that those who were given the intervention were significantly more likely to see their GP when symptoms developed.

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