The Health News Australia August 15 2017

Overview

  • Health problems associated with pollution from Australia’s ageing fleet of coal-fired power stations costs the nation $2.6 billion a year. According to news analysis from Environmental Justice Australia, Children and the elderly are especially prone to the lengthy list of health problems including asthma, lung cancer, heart attacks, stroke, respiratory disease, headaches, nausea, bronchitis, etc.
  • The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) issued the recall of a blood thinner and anaesthetic after receiving a report that an ampoule of Lignocaine was found in a Heparin package. The TGA advises that anyone who uses or provides care for a person who uses the Heparin injection 50 pack should carry out a visual inspection of the contents and if any anomalies are found, return the product to their pharmacy for refund or replacement.
  • Technology expert Joanne Orlando gives tips on how to be responsible for raising children whose life now revolves around digital devices and technology such not allowing kids who are 2 years old and younger to have devices.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2017/08/15/coal-power-comes-26b-health-bill

Health problems associated with pollution from Australia’s ageing fleet of coal-fired power stations costs the nation two point six billion dollars a year. Children and the elderly are especially prone to the long list of health problems including asthma, lung cancer, heart attacks, stroke, respiratory disease, headaches, nausea, bronchitis, choking and coughing, and irritation of the eyes, nose and throat, the new analysis from Environmental Justice Australia shows. People who live within fifty kilometers of a coal-fired power station are three to four times more likely to die prematurely than those further away. Newcastle General Practitioner Ben Ewald says coal power stations and mines are managed in a way that’s optimised to make the most profits, not to look after public health. He cites an example in a New South Wales town, which hosts large coal mines and electricity producers.

People who live near other power stations tell of having homes covered in dust and even having to wipe grime from washing that’s been drying outside. The report released on Tuesday finds the health issues of communities near coal generators – and the cost of dealing with them – could be reduced greatly if emission limits were tightened and better policed. Different states in Australia impose different emission limits – measured at different locations from the generator – and most are well above international standards such as those used in Europe, the US or China.

http://www.thesenior.com.au/news/urgent-recall-for-blood-thinners-issued/

A blood thinner and anaesthetic are urgently being recalled after a mix-up between the two products. The Therapeutic Goods Administration issued the recall after receiving a report that a flask of Lignocaine was found in a Heparin package. The TGA advises that anyone who uses or provides care for a person who uses the Heparin injection fifty pack should carry out a visual inspection of the contents and if any flasks are found, return the product to their pharmacy for refund or replacement.

If a patient has an affected pack, there is a risk that they will not have adequate supply of their medicine and could take the incorrect medicine, which could have serious health consequences.

If you notice any discrepancies with your medicine, return the product to your pharmacist.” Anyone with questions or concerns should talk to their health professional.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-14/science-week:-expert-tips-for-how-to-raise-tech-savvy-kids/8763366

When you grew up, there were no iPads, Google phones, Facebook or Snapchat, and you never had to worry about your digital identity or blue light. But fast-forward to two thousand seventeen and you’re now responsible for raising a child whose life will revolve around digital technology, and who will have to be tech-smart, tech-savvy, and tech-safe to survive out there in the wild. Expert Joanne Orlando — an analyst and researcher in technology and learning who has worked as an advisor for the Government, for Apple, and for the children’s television show Play School.

Here are some tips from her: According to Doctor Orlando, Australia generally follows the guidelines put out by the American Academy of Pediatrics, which were updated late last year. Kids who are two and younger really shouldn’t be using any screens at all. Children aged two to five can then use a screen for about an hour a day, and once they reach six, it is up to you to decide what’s appropriate; How much time is too much? It’s up to parents to decide what’s a healthy amount of screen time for your child. Set boundaries. For example, no devices during dinner time or while in the car.

Doctor Orlando hasn’t seen any firm evidence yet that technology can affect your child’s eyesight, but there is evidence that technology can disrupt their sleep pattern. She suggests looking at your usual going to bed practices; The age limit for most social media accounts is thirteen, and that’s because there are laws in the US that prevent websites from collecting any data from children aged  twelve and under; The average age for a child to get their first phone is around ten years old.  Kids need to be mature enough to look after a phone and to communicate respectfully, but it’s also important to consider the practicality for your family.

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