The Health News Australia July 20 2017

Overview

  • Ambulances have been queued 10 deep for hours outside some overstretched emergency wards across south-western Sydney, with doctors having to “tuck people in every corner” due to a surge in patients in the past forty eight hours. Australian Paramedics Association NSW president Steve Pearce said ambulance crews were having to wait for up to 3 and a half hours with patients on stretchers.
  • Three in 4 Australians who are vision impaired don’t need to be. This month, the Eye Surgeons’ Foundation is calling for donations for research projects to help end preventable blindness. The national not-for-profit organisation celebrates its 10th annual JulEYE eye health campaign this year. Since 2002 the foundation has supported more than 200  eye research projects, raised in excess of $21 million  for vision programs.
  • More than one thousand cases of almost-untreatable superbugs were reported in Australia in the twelve months to March this year. For the first time, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care has tracked dangerous bacteria resistant to the last line of antibiotics.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http:www.abc.net.aunews2017-07-18ambulances-queued-up-10-deep-outside-a-sydney-hospital8719568

Ambulances have been queued ten deep for hours outside some overstretched emergency wards across south-western Sydney,  with doctors having to “tuck people in every corner” due to a surge in patients in the past forty eight hours.  The acting director of emergency medicine at Liverpool Hospital said the hospital had been “slammed”  and it was trying to do everything it could to ease the queue of ambulances and make sure paramedics could get back on the road.

Professor Paul Middleton said that they had a massive day yesterday  and everybody from the executive of the hospital down to the nurses and doctors on the floor were basically making sure every single bed was utilised  and that they were tucking them into every corner,  as long as they were safe so that we could get the paramedics out on the streets again.  

Australian Paramedics Association New South Wales president Steve Pearce said ambulance crews were having to wait for up to three-and-a-half hours with patients on stretchers.

He said it meant there were fewer paramedics on the road to respond to emergencies and other urgent jobs.  “When the public call for an emergency the ambulance service will send the nearest ambulance to respond, but when all those crews … are stuck in a hospital block  and unable to be cleared because they’re still looking after patients,  those emergencies have to wait.” Mister Pearce said.  

Mister Pearce also stated the past forty eight hours had been particularly “horrendous”  but paramedics had been struggling with the situation for two years  and campaigning for hundreds more ambulance officers to be put on the road.

http:www.thesenior.com.auhealthdont-turn-a-blind-eye

Three in four Australians who are vision impaired don’t need to be.  And this month, The Eye Surgeons’ Foundation is calling for donations for research projects to help end preventable blindness.  The national not-for-profit organisation celebrates its tenth annual JulEYE eye health campaign this year.  Since two thousand and two the foundation has supported more than two hundred eye research projects,  raised in excess of twenty one million dollars for vision programs, and this year hopes to fund five promising new research projects.

Foundation chief executive Lisa Cheng said seventy five percent of Australians are vision impaired and don’t need to be  and the other twenty five per cent need cures, and the money raised will be spent on research focused on finding new answers and developing new treatments.

In Australia, more than four hundred fifty three thousand people are blind or vision impaired through diseases such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and rare eye conditions.  Former INXS band member and long-time JulEYE ambassador Kirk Pengilly knows first-hand the importance of eye research.  “At twenty seven I almost lost my sight to glaucoma – had it not been for the pioneering eye research and surgery that saved my sight, my life would have been very different,” he said.

http:www.abc.net.aunews2017-07-19superbug-report-reveals-rise-in-antibiotic-resistance-gonorrhoea8720598

More than one thousand cases of almost-untreatable superbugs were reported in Australia in the twelve months to March this year.  For the first time, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care has tracked dangerous bacteria resistant to the last line of antibiotics.  Senior medical adviser Professor John Turnidge said authorities could now track the spread of superbugs, almost in real time.

“These are superbugs which are resistant to almost everything,” he said.  What surprised authorities was the drastic increase in treatment-resistant gonorrhoea, which accounted for more than sixty percent of the superbugs.  This particular strain can no longer be killed by the antibiotic azithromycin.  Gonorrhoea is a sexually transmitted infection that has the potential to cause meningitis, and infertility in women.

“What worries us is that the single agent left for treating patients might fail and the disease spread,” Professor Turnidge said.  There was a three-fold increase in numbers of treatment-resistant gonorrhoea reported in both New South Wales and Western Australia throughout two thousand and sixteen.

He said health experts were now working on how to tackle the problem.

“We’ve got a lot of work to do and there are thoughts that we may need higher standards of infection control,” he said.  

 

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