The Health News United Kingdom April 12 2018

  • A record number of people donated organs in the UK last year, with the highest increase in 28 years. There were 1,575 donors, an 11% increase on the previous year. Fewer than 5,000 people a year die in circumstances where organ donation is possible.
    The figures come at a time when the NHS is debating whether England should follow Wales and introduce an opt-out donation scheme.
  • More than 40,000 men will be recruited into prostate cancer research, in a Government bid to turn the major killer into “a disease which no longer brings fear.” The £75m plans announced by Theresa May will see thousands of men offered the chance to try new treatments far earlier, while testing new ways to diagnose the disease.
  • According to new research, men who fail to match or exceed their parents’ educational achievements suffer levels of psychological distress similar to the impact of divorce, while women are largely unaffected.  Researchers at the University of Oxford analysed data from more than fifty thousand people across the UK and 27 other mainly European countries to compare their psychological states with their educational achievements.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 12th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43699485

A record number of people donated organs in the UK last year, with the highest increase in twenty eight years. There were one thousand five hundred seventy five donors, an eleven percent increase on the previous year. Ben Glean from Grimsby, who died aged eighteen, was one of those donors. He suffered a cardiac arrest from undiagnosed type one diabetes. His mum Karen said: “I knew what Ben wanted because we’d had the conversation, which made it easier for me.”
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He’d told his mum he was in support of donation but had not yet got around to joining the NHS Organ Donor Register. His kidneys were transplanted into two men in their thirties and his liver into a man in his fifties. His corneas were also used for two sight-saving transplants.
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Sally Johnson, NHS Blood and Transplant director of organ donation and transplantation, said the improvement had been magnificent.
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Fewer than five thousand people a year die in circumstances where organ donation is possible.
The figures come at a time when the NHS is debating whether England should follow Wales and introduce an opt-out donation scheme. The NHS has yet to publish the results of a public consultation which ran for twelve weeks until March six, and the feedback is being analysed. Wales introduced an opt-out system in December two thousand fifteen.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/04/09/theresa-may-unveils-war-prostate-cancer/

More than forty thousand men will be recruited into prostate cancer research, in a Government bid to turn the major killer into “a disease which no longer brings fear.” The seventy five million pound plans announced by Theresa May will see thousands of men offered the chance to try new treatments far earlier, while testing new ways to diagnose the disease. The Prime Minister said too many people were enduring the loss of a loved one because they were diagnosed too late, with prostate cancer now causing more deaths than breast cancer. She also confirmed plans to set announce a fully funded long-term plan for the NHS later this year, saying the strategy would be developed with health service leaders.
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Under the plans, more than forty thousand patients will be recruited for more than sixty studies in prostate cancer, to test treatments including more precise radiotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound and cryotherapy, alongside supportive interventions including exercise and dietary advice.

Early diagnosis is key to improving survival in prostate cancer: ninety eight percent of those who are diagnosed early survive for more than five years. This figure drops to thirty six percent for those who are diagnosed late. However, research has found almost half of men with the disease had to see their GP at least twice before being referred for tests which led to their diagnosis.  And current tests for the disease – which use a blood test to check levels of prostate specific antigens – are unreliable.
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The new studies will particularly target men aged fifty or over, those with a family history of prostate cancer and higher risk groups including black men – one in four of whom will develop the disease. Doctor Iain Frame, Director of Research at Prostate Cancer UK said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and it is now the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the UK.”

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/apr/10/men-fail-equal-parents-achievements-suffer-severe-distress-divorce

According to new research, men who fail to match or exceed their parents’ educational achievements suffer levels of psychological distress similar to the impact of divorce, while women are largely unaffected.  Researchers at the University of Oxford analysed data from more than fifty thousand people across the UK and twenty seven other mainly European countries to compare their psychological states with their educational achievements.

They found that for men, exceeding their parents’ educational achievements have a positive effect resulting in reduced psychological distress, while falling short appears to have a damaging effect on men’s well being with an increase in psychological distress . The research launched at the British Sociological Association’s annual conference at Northumbria University, contradicts earlier studies that found improving on parental academic achievements appeared to have little positive impact on psychological state. The study found that the consequences of doing better or worse than their parents were “observed primarily among men rather than among women”.

It was found that men whose educational achievements were in the bottom level, and whose parents were in the top, were more than twice as likely to be among the top ten percent most psychologically distressed group of individuals than those whose educational level matched their parents’.

The paper, titled Intergenerational Education Mobility and Psychological Distress in Europe, found that men with middling educational achievement whose parents were top achievers were seventy five percent more likely to be psychologically distressed than those whose level was the same as their parents. Men whose educational level was at the top and whose parents’ were at the bottom level were fifty percent less likely to be psychologically distressed than men whose level was the same as their parents.

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