The Health News United Kingdom November 20 2017

  • A study of 3.4  million Swedes has found that dog owners have a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease or other causes. The team analysed national registries for people aged 40 to 80, and compared them to dog ownership registers. They found there was a lower risk of cardiovascular disease in owners of dogs, particularly of hunting breeds. The researchers said dogs had a particularly protective effect for those who live alone.
  • As the two thousand seventeen Budget approaches, there has been a growing call on the Chancellor to ensure that health, and particularly mental health, funding is given a boost in order to meet the Prime Minister’s ambition is tackling the ‘burning injustices’ of poor access to help when people need it. Mental health care accounts for about 12% of NHS spending yet mental ill health represents about 23% of need. Children’s mental health in particular has long been underfunded, resulting in serious shortages and long delays for parents and young people trying to get help.
  • Prostate Cancer UK has said more research needs to be done to connect an increased risk of prostate cancer with foods including soybeans, tofu and green tea. A US study, published on November 8 in the International Journal of Cancer, claimed men eating foods rich in isoflavones could be at risk of developing prostate cancer – the UK’s most common cancer in males. Prostate cancer affects about 47,000 more people in the UK every year.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42009932

A study of three point four million Swedes has found that dog owners have a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease or other causes. The team analysed national registries for people aged forty to eighty, and compared them to dog ownership registers. They found there was a lower risk of cardiovascular disease in owners of dogs, particularly of hunting breeds. While owning a dog may help physical activity, researchers said it may be active people who choose to own dogs. They also said owning a dog may protect people from cardiovascular disease by increasing their social contact or wellbeing, or by changing the owner’s bacterial microbiome. The microbiome is the collection of microscopic species that live in the gut. It’s thought a dog may influence its owner’s microbiomes as dogs change the dirt in home environments, exposing people to bacteria they may not have encountered otherwise.

The researchers said dogs had a specific protective effect for those who live alone.
“The results showed that single dog owners had a thirty three percent reduction in risk of death and eleven percent reduction in risk of heart attack,” compared to single non-owners, said lead study author Mwenya Mubanga of Uppsala University. People who live alone have been shown previously to be at a higher risk of cardiovascular death.

For their study, published in Scientific Reports, the team looked at data from two thousand one to two thousand twelve. In Sweden, every visit to a hospital is recorded in national databases – while dog ownership registration has been mandatory since two thousand one. Owning a dog from breeds originally bred for hunting, such as terriers, retrievers and scent hounds, was associated with the lowest risk of cardiovascular disorder.

Doctor Mike Knapton of the British Heart Foundation said: “Owning a dog is associated with reduced mortality and risk of having heart disease. Previous studies have shown this association but have not been as conclusive – largely due to the population size studied here.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/a-budget-for-better-mental-health_uk_5a0f0e04e4b023121e0e9215

As the two thousand seventeen Budget approaches, there has been a growing call on the Chancellor to ensure that health, and particularly mental health, funding is given a boost in order to meet the Prime Minister’s ambition in tackling the ‘burning injustices’ of poor access to help when people need it. The need for fairer funding for mental health services within the NHS is now widely known and clear. Mental health care accounts for about twelve percent of NHS spending yet mental ill health represents about twenty three percent of need. Children’s mental health in particular has long been underfunded, resulting in serious shortages and long delays for parents and young people trying to get help.

The Government has already made some welcome and important commitments to boost mental health service spending and support. First, in order to deliver the NHS’s Five Year Forward View for Mental Health, published last year, the Government pledged that an extra one billion pounds would be spent on mental health services by two thousand twenty and two thousand twenty one: a significant and welcome boost to fund much needed talking therapy services, crisis care and early help for young adults (among others). And second, it has pledged to spend one point four billion pounds spread over five years to improve children and young people’s mental health services.

It is now crucial that the funds earmarked for mental health support, for children and adults alike, are protected and spent as intended. In every local area, we need to see real increases in spending on mental health care coupled with the changes that need to take place to meet people’s needs effectively. In a context where the chief executive of NHS England, Simon Stevens, has warned that the NHS’s finances are under extreme pressure, it is more important than ever that we do not repeat past patterns of ‘raiding’ mental health budgets to offset deficits in other parts of the system.

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/879103/prostate-cancer-symptoms-warning-food-tofu-movember

Prostate Cancer UK has said more research needs to be done to connect an increased risk of prostate cancer with foods including soybeans, tofu and green tea. A US study, published on November eight in the International Journal of Cancer, claimed men eating foods rich in isoflavones could be at risk of developing prostate cancer – the UK’s most common cancer in males.  Prostate Cancer UK director Doctor Iain Frame told Express.co.uk: “This study suggests a potential link between foods high in isoflavones such as soyabeans and tofu and increased risk of advanced prostate cancer, however, there is currently not enough concrete evidence to say whether this is actually the case.
….
The study was published during Movember – the annual month-long charity campaign to raise awareness for men’s health. Doctor Jianjun Zhang, lead author of the research from Fairbanks School of Public Health at Indiana University in Indianapolis, writes in the study abstract: “Prostate cancer is a major cancer in Western countries, and its incidence rate has been remarkably increasing in Asian countries during the last several decades.  The researchers  compared the number of prostate cancer cases in more than twenty seven thousand men over an eleven year period. The cancer was found in two thousand five hundred ninety eight of them, with two thousand eighty seven being advanced cases. Men taking part in the study were asked to write down everything they ate over the period. From this, scientists reported they found isoflavones to be linked to a higher risk of developing prostate cancer. Prostate cancer affects about forty seven thousand more people in the UK every year and according to Cancer Research UK, there were forty six thousand six hundred ninety new cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in two thousand fourteen.

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