The Health News Australia August 1 2017

Overview

  • Research from Cancer Council Victoria suggests that free giveaways like movie character toys have a powerful influence over what kids want to eat and can even make them more likely to choose healthier options. This study involved almost 1,000 Australian children between 5 and 9 years of age, who were offered a number of healthy and unhealthy meal choices after watching a movie trailer followed by a fast food advertisement or leisure activity.
  • The weight of a healthy human liver is typically one point five kilograms or less. But for  Fiona Murray, hers weighed 12.8 kilograms. After doctors removed it, Mrs. Murray said it was a “no-brainer” to donate her liver to The University of Queensland so it can be used in medical studies.
  • A towering high-rise aged care development proposed in a south-west Brisbane suburb is prompting debate about how high is too high. Provider TriCare is planning to build three glass-panelled towers of 9 to 16 storeys in Taringa, which is double the current heights in the suburb. It is to be fast-tracked for assessment by the Brisbane City Council under developer incentives that were introduced last year to help boost aged care and retirement beds in Brisbane.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 1st of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-01/toy-promotions-powerful-effect-on-what-kids-want-to-eat/8761222

Free giveaways like movie character toys have a powerful influence over what kids want to eat and can even make them more likely to choose healthier options, research from Cancer Council Victoria suggests. The study involved almost one thousand Australian children between five and nine years of age who were offered a number of healthy and unhealthy meal choices after watching a movie trailer followed by a fast food advertisement or leisure activity.

Some of the meals came with a movie character toy and some did not. Overall it found children were more likely to choose fast food. But the interest in healthy meals significantly increased when a toy was offered.

Lead author Helen Dixon from the Cancer Council said it proved what food companies have known for decades. “When a movie character toy was offered with a fast food meal, kids were more likely to want that meal regardless of how healthy or unhealthy it was,” Doctor Dixon said.

“When you paired the toy with a healthy meal, kids were more likely to believe the meal looked better, they thought it would taste better and they’d feel more happy if their parents bought them that meal.” Jane Martin from the Obesity Policy Coalition said these powerful fast food promotions were so widespread it was very difficult to keep kids away from it. She said that it’s very, very hard to protect your kids from this kind of promotion, it’s virtually impossible and with one in four Australian kids currently overweight or obese, we should be supporting parents to make healthier choices, and not setting them up to battle with their kids over unhealthy food.

“I think that most children would not be requesting to go into a fast food franchise without the toy and the collectables’’, Miss Martin added.

According to Miss Martin around forty percent of children’s diets are made up of unhealthy food, and it can be difficult to reverse weight and obesity as adults.

https://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/2017/07/liver-eight-times-normal-size-donated-student-learning

The weight of a healthy human liver is typically one point five kilograms or less. After feeling like she was “pregnant for seven-odd years” Fiona Murray had hers removed and it topped twelve kilograms. Missis Murray knew she could never become an organ donor due to a hereditary disease, but she has selflessly offered her organ to be used by The University of Queensland in a different way.“I was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease at twenty five, and in my thirties the condition worsened as cysts developed in my liver,” said Missis Murray, now forty seven.

“I was unable to bend over to perform simple tasks like tying a shoelace, and looked like I was pregnant for seven-odd years until receiving a kidney and liver transplant in two thousand fourteen.” When doctors removed her liver, it weighed twelve point eight kilograms.

As well as focussing on her recovery, Missis Murray made a decision to donate her diseased liver to UQ’s Integrated Pathology Learning Centre or IPLC within the Faculty of Medicine.

The IPLC houses two thousand five hundred pathology specimens and uses the latest technology to create interactive learning resources to teach students about human diseases. Missis Murray said it was a “no-brainer” to donate her liver.

Missis Murray said she wanted to thank her donor family, but due to strict privacy laws she was unable to meet them, and instead wrote an anonymous letter of thanks.

In Australia only one in three people have joined the Australian Organ Donor Register and more than one thousand four hundred people are waiting for an organ transplant.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-01/taringa-tricare-aged-care-development-debate-brisbane/8760656

A towering high-rise aged care development proposed in a south-west Brisbane suburb is prompting debate about how high is too high. Provider TriCare is planning to build three glass-panelled towers of nine to sixteen storeys in Taringa, which is double the current heights in the suburb. It is to be fast-tracked for assessment by the Brisbane City Council under developer incentives that were introduced last year to help boost aged care and retirement beds in Brisbane. The plan is possible because the location in Seven Oaks Street is a former pathology site, which is deemed community use/medical purpose. Therefore the site is not limited to just three levels as residents had always believed. About one hundred locals, at the average age of seventy, have begun protesting, claiming the plan will “kill the area”.

Architect Lester Ehrlich says the design is a “blight on architecture” because of its sheer size. “At sixteen levels this is just the developer saying ‘up yours to you guys we don’t care’,” he said. Kay Hogan, who has lived in the apartment block above the site for twenty two years, has made an impassioned plea to the council to scale down the development: “Please don’t do it, please don’t approve it, you are breaking our hearts,” she said. It is creating a dilemma for the council trying to cater for the ageing population, with projections showing the city needs an annual increase of more than three thousand beds.

TriCare’s property and planning manager Simon Dwyer said he understood the angst in the community, but the company was looking at filling the aged care void.

A decision on this Taringa proposal is due within months.

 

 

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