The Health News Australia September 16 2017

Overview

  • Australians are being encouraged to share their mental health concerns with their employers as part of R U OK? Day. According to the most recent Australian Bureau of Statistics data, 3,027 people died by suicide in 2015, the highest number on record.
  • Cancer survival between Australia’s rich and poor is widening, leading to urgent calls for action to address the inequity. While cancer survival has improved in general, the socio-economically disadvantaged are still more likely to die from the disease.
  • Researchers from Columbia University Medical Centre (CUMC) have uncovered a clear link between total sedentary time and an increased risk of early death.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 16th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/mind/r-u-ok-day-the-tough-conversation-about-mental-health-you-should-have-with-your-boss/news-story/48b2199f69977c013fb7f5479c9b65b3

Australians are being encouraged to share their mental health concerns with their employers as part of R U OK? Day. The public awareness campaign aims to reduce the number of suicides in Australia and start a conversation about mental health. According to the most recent Australian Bureau of Statistics data, three thousand twenty seven people died by suicide in two thousand fifteen, the highest number on record. That equates to more than eight deaths by suicide every day. One Australian study found that seventeen per cent of suicides in Victoria from two thousand to two thousand seven were work-related. Suicide is the leading cause of death among young people and occurs among men at a rate three times greater than that for women.
For every death by suicide, it is estimated that as many as thirty people attempt to end their lives — that’s approximately sixty five thousand three hundred suicide attempts each year.
Workplace Mental Health Institute founder Pedro Diaz says recent research his organisation conducted about mental illness in the workplace is particularly alarming.

Mister Diaz said that there is a direct correlation between the large number of men who take their own lives and society’s expectation on men to be strong, stable breadwinners. He added

it’s important that employers are emotionally open with their employees, both male and female.

http://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/09/14/10/29/cancer-survival-widens-among-rich-and-poor

Cancer survival between Australia’s rich and poor is widening, leading to urgent calls for action to address the inequity. A study conducted by the Cancer Institute New South Wales and published in journal BMC Public Health shows the disparity in NSW has nearly trebled in thirty years. While cancer survival has improved in general, the socio-economically disadvantaged are still more likely to die from the disease, says Professor David Currow, Chief Cancer Officer and CEO of the Cancer Institute NSW.

Researchers analysed cancer registry data from between nineteen eighty to two thousand eight to explore the outcome differences in socio-economically disadvantaged populations over time.
People in socio-economically disadvantaged areas across the state have a fifteen per cent elevated risk of dying from cancer compared with the least disadvantaged areas. The findings also show this disparity has grown significantly – from seven percent in nineteen eighty to nineteen eighty nine, to fourteen percent in nineteen ninety to ninety ninety nine and now twenty four per cent in two thousand to two thousand eight.

http://coach.nine.com.au/2017/09/13/09/57/sedentary-behaviour-pattern-move-every-30-minutes

“I spend too much time sitting down” is just one entry on the long, long, long list of health concerns we’re all burdened by. But standing up and moving every half an hour will undo some of the damage of all that time spent on your butt.

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Centre make that recommendation off the back of a new paper published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. Their study uncovered a clear link between total sedentary time and an increased risk of early death. But it also found that spending long, uninterrupted stints without moving is just as risky, regardless of how much you exercise. Analysing the physical activity of almost eight thousand US adults determined that those with the greatest overall sedentary time, as well as those who frequently remained sedentary for sixty to ninety minutes, almost doubled their risk of early death.

“We tend to think of sedentary behaviour as just the sheer volume of how much we sit around each day,” said the study’s lead investigator Doctor Keith Diaz, from CUMC’s Department of Medicine, in a statement.
….
On average, the participants in the study were sedentary for seventy seven percent of their waking hours, equivalent to more than twelve hours. The statistics on Australians’s physical activity levels are just as grim: on average, we’re sedentary for seventy percent of our waking hours.On the bright side, those who broke up their sedentary time every half an hour had the lowest risk of early death.The study co-author Doctor Monika Safford’s added that the research underscores that “sitting really is the new smoking”, particularly long periods of sitting.

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