The Health News USA January 20 2018

  • Late last week, Hayden Porter, a 15-year-old freshman at a high school in Ohio, took his life. He was the 6th current or former teenage student from the school district to kill themselves within the past 6 months. Three of the suicides occurred in a span of 11 days in January. Police say the suicides don’t look like they are linked, and the methods the children used were varied.
  • Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. He spoke at The Kennedy Forum in Chicago on Tuesday as part of a national summit focusing on depression, addiction, and other mental health issues.
  • An Indiana hospital system said it paid a $50,000 ransom to hackers who hijacked patient data. The ransomware attack accessed the computers of Hancock Health in Greenfield through an outside vendor’s account Thursday. It quickly infected the system by locking out data and changing the names of more than 1,400 files to “I’m sorry.”

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th of January 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://edition.cnn.com/2018/01/16/health/ohio-suicide-cluster/index.html

Late last week, Hayden Porter, a fifteen-year-old freshman at a high school in Ohio, took his life. He was the sixth current or former teenage student from the school district to kill themselves within the past six months. Three of the suicides occurred in a span of eleven days in January.
Police say the suicides don’t look like they are linked, and the methods the children used were varied.

Chief Michael Pomesky said over the past five days, his officers have responded to more than two dozen calls concerning potential suicides or requests for police to check on someone. He said the community of Perry Township, about an hour’s drive south of Cleveland, is in crisis.
He said: “We pretty much went from no suicides to this.” Porter’s mother, Ashley Jones, told CNN affiliate WJW she thinks her son was bullied. Her son, worried about what four boys might do to him, had to be picked up from school one day, she told the Cleveland station. But she had no idea her son would kill himself.

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According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost one in five teenagers between fifteen and nineteen has considered suicide, and nearly ten percent have attempted it. Among Americans between ten and twenty four, suicide was the second-leading cause of death in two thousand fifteen. Melissa C. Mercado, a behavioral scientist in the CDC’s division of violence prevention said that some proven strategies for preventing suicide among youth include “strengthening access to and delivery of suicide care, creating protective environments, promoting youth connectedness, teaching coping and problem-solving skills, and identifying and supporting at-risk youth.”

Officials at a Friday news conference in Ohio said the one thousand seven hundred students at the high school, which is in Massillon, will be provided with an increasing number of resources.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/michael-phelps-helping-others-with-depression-light-years-better-than-olympic-gold/

Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. He spoke at The Kennedy Forum in Chicago on Tuesday as part of a national summit focusing on depression, addiction, and other mental health issues.

Phelps, the most decorated Olympian of all time, was the main attraction. Phelps has won twenty eight Olympic medals, twenty three of them gold; but the swimming sensation said, at the height of his Olympic career, he considered killing himself.

After several days holed up in his room, Phelps says he picked himself up and found the strength to admit he had a problem and needed help. He said it’s transformed him, and saved his life. Now, Phelps said his new mission is to talk about his struggles in the hopes of encouraging others to do the same and get help when they need it most.

When people tell him going public with his story of depression and suicidal thoughts helped save someone’s life, he said the feeling he gets is incomparable.
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Phelps was interviewed by political strategist David Axelrod, who earlier talked about the day in nineteen seventy five when a Chicago police officer knocked on his dorm room door to tell him of his father’s suicide.
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The Kennedy Forum was founded five years ago by former U.S. Representative Patrick Kennedy, who left Congress in order to focus on issues involving brain diseases like mental health and addiction. He said the forum is meant to set a new standard for the future of healthcare in the United States. Kennedy said he hopes Phelps can do for depression what former President Ronald Reagan did for Alzheimer’s disease when he went public with his diagnosis. Kennedy would like to see an increase in funding to be used in the fight against depression and suicide.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/nation-now/2018/01/17/hackers-held-patient-data-ransom-so-indiana-hospital-system-paid-50-000/1042266001/

An Indiana hospital system said it paid a fifty thousand dollar ransom to hackers who hijacked patient data. The ransomware attack accessed the computers of Hancock Health in Greenfield through an outside vendor’s account Thursday. It quickly infected the system by locking out data and changing the names of more than one thousand four hundred files to “I’m sorry.”

The virus demanded four bitcoins in exchange for unlocking the data, which included patient medical records and company emails. The hospital paid the amount, about fifty thousand dollars at the time, early Saturday morning, said Rob Matt, senior vice president and chief strategy officer. Mister Matt said that the data started unlocking soon after the money was transferred.
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Hancock Health includes about two dozen health care facilities, including Hancock Regional Hospital in Greenfield, about fifteen miles east of Indianapolis. The virus infects the computer network by encrypting files or locking down the entire system. Victims log on and receive a message telling them the files have been hijacked and to get the files back they will have to pay.
Hospitals are a frequent target of these attacks. In May, a ransomware virus affected more than two hundred thousand victims in one hundred fifty countries, including more than twenty percent of hospitals in the United Kingdom. That attack was later traced to North Korea.

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