The Health News USA October 22 2017

  • On Thursday, the fate of the health law’s subsidy for copays and deductibles remained unclear as a bipartisan congressional deal to continue payments faced political roadblocks. Separately, state attorneys general were seeking a federal court order to keep the money flowing. Trump’s attempt to shut off the subsidy for copays and deductibles would cause a different subsidy to jump up, the one for premiums.
  • Two dozen senators — half Republican, half Democrat — signed onto a Senate plan Thursday to resume critical Obamacare payments and empower governors to experiment with the 2010 health law. The 12 Republican co-sponsors are critical because if all 48 members of the Democratic caucus voted for the bill as well, it would be enough to overcome a filibuster and clear the bill — should GOP leaders agree to bring it to the floor.
  • While Halloween candy wouldn’t be classified as a health food, that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy any without feeling guilt afterward. “My philosophy is that you can have these things in moderation,” says Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey. There are a few strategies you can use to keep yourself in check.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 22nd of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/trumps-health-subsidy-shutdown-lead-free-insurance-50580570?cid=clicksource_26_2_hero_headlines_bsq_hed\

If President Donald Trump prevails in shutting down a major “Obamacare” health insurance subsidy, it would have the unintended consequence of making free basic coverage available to more people, and making upper-tier plans more affordable. The unexpected assessment comes from consultants, policy experts, and state officials, who are trying to discern the potential fallout from a Washington health care debate that’s becoming even more complicated and volatile.

On Thursday, the fate of the health law’s subsidy for copays and deductibles remained unclear as a bipartisan congressional deal to continue payments faced political roadblocks. Separately, state attorneys general were seeking a federal court order to keep the money flowing.

Trump’s attempt to shut off the subsidy for copays and deductibles would cause a different subsidy to jump up, the one for premiums.

The Obama-era health care law actually has two major subsidies that benefit consumers with low-to-moderate incomes. The one targeted by Trump reimburses insurers for reducing copays and deductibles, and is under a legal cloud. The other subsidy is a tax credit that reduces the premiums people pay, and it is not in jeopardy.

If the subsidy for copays and deductibles gets eliminated, insurers would raise premiums to recoup the money, since by law they have to keep offering reduced copays and deductibles to consumers with modest incomes.

The subsidy for premiums is designed to increase with the rising price of insurance. So government spending to subsidize premiums would jump.

Final premiums for twenty eighteen have not been officially unveiled yet, and some states are still making adjustments. Sign-up season starts November one.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/oct/19/alexander-trump-cheering-bipartisan-health-talks/

Two dozen senators — half Republican, half Democrat — signed onto a Senate plan Thursday to resume critical Obamacare payments and empower governors to experiment with the two thousand and ten health law.

The twelve Republican co-sponsors are critical because if all forty eight members of the Democratic caucus voted for the bill as well, it would be enough to overcome a filibuster and clear the bill — should GOP leaders agree to bring it to the floor.

The twenty six page bill would approve payments in twenty eighteen and twenty nineteen for what’s known as “cost-sharing reductions” — federal money sent to insurers to reimburse them for covering out-of-pocket health care costs of lower-income Americans. Mr. Trump recently said the administration can no longer legally make the payments without congressional approval, prompting fears of higher premiums.

Mister Trump appeared to back the new deal on Tuesday, then seemed to back off it Wednesday.

On Thursday, he was noncommittal, and appeared to be looking ahead to another repeal fight next year, where he wants to send Obamacare money to the states and put decisions in their hands through block grants.

A bipartisan group of ten governors also want congressional leaders to take up the bill, so insurers in their states don’t raise their premiums to make up for missing cost-sharing money — or withdraw from the marketplace altogether.

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/nutritionists-rank-halloween-candy-better-worst-ncna809956

While Halloween candy wouldn’t be classified as a health food, that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy any without feeling guilt afterward. “My philosophy is that you can have these things in moderation,” says Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey.

There are a few strategies you can use to keep yourself in check. “One thing that I like to suggest is to only buy Halloween candy the week of — or maybe even the day before — Halloween so that it’s not sitting around your house and you’re not inclined to eat it before trick-or-treaters come over,” says Natalie Rizzo, RD, New York city-based registered dietitian.

When you do head to the store for Halloween candy, pick up ones that come in bite-size, individually wrapped packaging, says Gorin — and see if you can limit yourself to one or two. Take a long time to chew on a piece of candy so that you really savor the flavor and feel satisfied after just a little bit, suggests Gorin.

A study found that people ate about two more pieces of candy when it was placed in clear bowls near their desks versus in opaque containers further away from them.

Another tip: Store your Halloween candy on a top shelf in a sealed container so it’s out of sight, says Samantha Cassetty, RD, head of nutrition at Next Jump. “That way when you’re reaching for it, you’re doing so with purpose and mindfulness,” she says. A study published in the International Journal of Obesity, found that people ate about two more pieces of candy when it was placed in clear bowls near their desks versus when candy was stored in opaque containers further away from them.

But what if you do down a whole bag of candy corn or peanut butter cups in one sitting? “Obviously, it’s a hard time of year — if you’re at an office, there’s probably a candy bowl, and if your kids are trick or treating, it’s hard to say, ‘I’m not going to touch it,’” says Gorin. “If you have more than planned, just start over right away. Say, ‘OK, I ate too much candy, and right now I’m going to stop.’”

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