The Health News Australia November 10 2017

  • More controversy for SA Health’s electronic medical record, with the department forced to go cap in hand to Cabinet for an additional cash infusion, taking the total cost of the troubled system to almost half a billion dollars. Pouring another $49 million into the Enterprise Patient Administration System (EPAS) will lead to a major system upgrade. Originally budgeted at $408 million in 2011 before blowing out to $422 million, this new funding injection takes the cost of EPAS to $471 million over the 10 years to 2021.
  • The iconic “Slip, Slop, Slap” campaign started in Queensland in the 1980’s has begun to pay off, with new research revealing rates of melanoma in the Sunshine State are finally stabilising. The study of invasive melanomas found between 1995 and 2014 showed the number of skin cancers identified in people aged 40 to 59 years had plateaued – meaning for the first time only cases in people aged over 60 were increasing.
  • A landmark review of more than 1.6 million admissions to Australian and New Zealand intensive care units will enable hospitals and healthcare authorities to better target management of particular cancers. The analysis revealed that nearly 214,000 admissions to hospital intensive care units (ICUs) between 2000 and 2016 were due to cancer, and examined the types of cancers in hospital ICU admissions, the age of patients and mortality rates

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 10th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.healthcareit.com.au/article/new-funding-blowout-sa-health%E2%80%99s-epas-takes-cost-almost-half-billion-dollars

More controversy for South Australia Health’s electronic medical record, with the department forced to go cap in hand to Cabinet for an additional cash infusion, taking the total cost of the troubled system to almost half a billion dollars. Pouring another forty nine million dollars into the Enterprise Patient Administration System or EPAS will lead to a major system upgrade, according to the health department’s Deputy Chief Executive Don Frater.
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Originally budgeted at four hundred eight million dollars in two thousand eleven before blowing out to four hundred twenty two million, this new funding injection takes the cost of EPAS to four hundred seventy one million dollars over the ten years to two thousand twenty one. Concerns from clinicians have been ongoing, and in August the state’s Australian Medical Association claimed that if EPAS were a car it would be recalled. The doctor’s lobby group said a survey of medical staff suggested the system was “not fit for purpose,” and had led to pathology mix-ups, prescribing mishaps and difficulty in finding records when they are urgently needed.

A third of survey respondents claimed EPAS was directly responsible for “near misses” while nearly twenty per cent said the system caused adverse patient outcomes. Serious errors included charting medications for the wrong patient, critical delays in obtaining records on surgical patients and pathology errors such as mixing patients and specimens. Respondents also found the system slow and difficult to use. But South Australia’s then Health Minister Jack Snelling, who resigned in September, claimed the AMA was a “serial whinger”.

According to SA Health, EPAS has led to significant improvements in medication safety, with errors occurring in five per cent of prescriptions in SA hospitals before the system was implemented, compared to zero point zero zero three per cent once it was in use. The system, which is uses Allscripts technology, was expected to be ready to go live for the opening of the new Royal Adelaide Hospital in September but instead had a “limited activation,” with Snelling conceding to SA Parliament that paper records would also be in use. EPAS will be fully implemented in the state’s new major metropolitan showcase health facility by early two thousand eighteen.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/melanoma-queensland-rates-stabilise-with-slip-slop-slap-message/news-story/50e5cb434f6ca626389e0d694da14dd1

The iconic “Slip, Slop, Slap” campaign started in Queensland in the nineteen eighties has begun to pay off, with new research revealing rates of melanoma in the Sunshine State are finally stabilising. Despite retaining the dubious title of the world’s melanoma capital, landmark research recently released show diagnosed cases of the potentially deadly skin cancer are on the decline in people under the age of forty in Queensland. The study of invasive melanomas found between nineteen ninety five and two thousand fourteen showed the number of skin cancers identified in people aged forty to fifty nine years had plateaued – meaning for the first time only cases in people aged over sixty were increasing.

Cancer Council Queensland head of research Professor Joanne Aitken said the “highly significant” research, published in the International Journal of Cancer, showed prevention was the right path in the war against skin cancer. She stated: “We have the highest rates in the world of melanoma in Queensland, and yet we have somehow managed to achieve what looks to be falling melanoma rates.” She also added: “It suggests that the sun-protection campaigns that Queensland was the first to introduce to Australia – was the first to introduce around the world in the nineteen eighties – are finally beginning to pay off.”

The study by the CCQ, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, University of Queensland and Princess Alexandra Hospital also looked at incidence of “in situ” melanoma where cancerous cells were confined to the top layers of the skin.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/oncology/4/news/nc1/study-reveals-extent-of-cancer-cases-in-hospital-icus/2992/

A landmark review of more than one point six million admissions to Australian and New Zealand intensive care units will enable hospitals and healthcare authorities to better target management of particular cancers. The analysis revealed that nearly two hundred fourteen thousand admissions to hospital intensive care units between two thousand and two thousand sixteen were due to cancer, and examined the types of cancers in hospital ICU admissions, the age of patients and mortality rates. Doctor Eamon Raith, an intensive care speciality trainee at the Royal Adelaide Hospital and Doctor Claire Frauenfelder, a surgical specialty trainee at Royal Adelaide Hospital,  have presented their findings on November three at an anaesthetists’ conference in Sydney.

The number of admissions to ICU for patients with cancer increased from three thousand eight hundred ninety four admissions or ten percent of ICU admissions in two thousand to twenty one thousand five hundred forty one admissions in two thousand sixteen or fourteen percent of all ICU admissions in two thousand sixteen. The analysis found that seventy eight point seven per cent of patients were admitted to ICU following surgery related to their cancer, with gastrointestinal, brain and respiratory tract cancers including lung cancer being the most common. Despite the increased number of admissions to ICU, the mortality rate for all patients admitted to ICU with cancer fell, from seventeen point seven percent in two thousand to eight point forty three per cent in two thousand sixteen. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s Cancer in Australia two thousand seventeen report lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death followed by colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and pancreatic cancer.

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