The Health News USA April 12 2018

  • Chicken salad contaminated with salmonella bacteria made by an Iowa food-processing company and distributed by Fareway Stores has sickened 265 people in eight states and caused 1 death in Iowa. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the outbreak, which sickened people from early January through mid-March, appears to have ended.
  • Health-conscious consumers may favor foods with less added sugar, but many popular cereals are moving in the opposite direction. The Wall Street Journal reports cereal manufacturers are doubling down on their sugary ways in an attempt to counter years of declining sales. They’re increasing the sugar content of some cereals after healthier versions failed to win back consumers who were defecting to Greek-style yogurt, protein bars, and other breakfast items with higher protein and fewer carbohydrates. According to Mintel’s research, 43% of adults eat cereal as a snack at home.
  • California’s government would set prices for hospital stays, doctor visits and other health care services under legislation introduced Monday, vastly remaking the industry in a bid to lower health care costs. The proposal, which drew swift opposition from the healthcare industry, comes amid a fierce debate in California as activists on the left push aggressively for a system that would provide government-funded insurance for everyone in the state.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 12th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/salmonella-chicken-salad-kills-1-sickens-265-8-states-n864071

Chicken salad contaminated with salmonella bacteria made by an Iowa food-processing company and distributed by Fareway Stores has sickened two hundred sixty five people in eight states and caused one death in Iowa. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the outbreak, which sickened people from early January through mid-March, appears to have ended.

Food safety attorney Bill Marler of Seattle says he and Iowa lawyer Steve Wandro represent forty eight people filing lawsuits against Triple T Specialty Meats of Ackley, Iowa, which made the chicken salad, and Fareway, based in Boone, Iowa. The CDC says two hundred forty were sickened in Iowa and one person died. Illinois reported ten cases. Other states reporting cases included Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/why-cereal-companies-are-returning-to-sugar/

Health-conscious consumers may favor foods with less added sugar, but many popular cereals are moving in the opposite direction. The Wall Street Journal reports cereal manufacturers are doubling down on their sugary ways in an attempt to counter years of declining sales. They’re increasing the sugar content of some cereals after healthier versions failed to win back consumers who were defecting to Greek-style yogurt, protein bars, and other breakfast items with higher protein and fewer carbohydrates.

….
Wall Street Journal reporter Annie Gasparao told CBS News: “The people who are eating cereal are eating it because it’s fun and it tastes good and it looks fun with fun colors. They aren’t eating it to be healthy.” As she reported for the paper, cereal sales have declined eleven percent over the past five years to around nine billion dollars in two thousand seventeen, according to Mintel, a consumer research firm. And while sugary cereal is typically marketed to children, adults are buying the product more and more for themselves, especially millennials who are eating it as a snack or a dessert.
….
According to Mintel’s research, forty three percent of adults eat cereal as a snack at home. Of people who eat cereal, thirty percent choose cereal that tastes good regardless of how nutritious it is. Sales data shows that healthier cereals are not resonating with adult customers. Last year, while children’s cereal sales fell about one percent, sales of cereals marketed for adults fell seven percent. In response, many cereal makers are introducing, or re-introducing, sweeter options. Post recently brought back Oreo Os cereal, made to taste like the popular Nabisco cookie, which it had previously discontinued in two thousand seven.

Kellogg discontinued its lower-sugar version of Frosted Flakes and has since released chocolate and cinnamon varieties. And after giving Trix a makeover with all-natural ingredients, General Mills encountered a backlash and subsequently brought back the original, artificially-colored and flavored recipe.

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/article208343779.html

California’s government would set prices for hospital stays, doctor visits and other health care services under legislation introduced Monday, vastly remaking the industry in a bid to lower health care costs. The proposal, which drew swift opposition from the healthcare industry, comes amid a fierce debate in California as activists on the left push aggressively for a system that would provide government-funded insurance for everyone in the state.

Across the country, rising health care costs have put the industry, lawmakers and employers and consumers at odds. The proposal in California would affect private health plans, including those offered by employers and purchased by individuals. A nine-member commission appointed by the governor and legislative leaders would set prices for everything from a physical exam to an allergy test to heart bypass surgery. No other state has such a requirement.
…..
Sara Flocks, policy coordinator for the California Labor Federation, a union coalition said:  “This is something that is eating up our wages and it is increasing income inequality. This is a fundamental question of fairness.”

Health care providers say price controls would encourage doctors to move out of state or retire, making it harder for people to see a physician when they’re sick, and force hospitals to lay off staff or, in some cases, close their doors. The California Medical Association, which represents physicians, called the proposal “radical” and warned that it would reduce choices for consumers.

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