The Health News USA November 27 2017

  • According to a new study, almost half of cancer diagnoses in the U.S. are linked to preventable causes, with smoking, excess body weight and alcohol consumption the most common risk factors. Based on federal data, researchers found that in 2014 42%of all diagnosis and forty five percent of all deaths were attributed to preventive risk factors. Researchers evaluated over 1.5 million cases of cancer and almost 600,000 cancer deaths to understand their link to some of the most risky lifestyle factors.
  • A US study suggests that on days when parents feel stressed or depressed, kids are less likely to get homemade food for dinner. For the study, researchers observed 150 children ages 5 to 7 years at home with their families and used several methods to assess how parents’ moods influenced what foods went on the table. Among other things, researchers did home visits to observe meal planning and preparation and examined data from food diaries, surveys and interviews. Most of the adult participants were mothers (35 years old on average).
  • A federal judge has struck down Texas’ ban on a common second-trimester abortion procedure. US District Judge Lee Yeakel has overturned Texas Senate Bill 8–which was passed earlier this year and banned doctors from performing dilation and evacuation abortions. In a D&E abortion, a doctor dilates the patient’s cervix before dismembering and removing the fetus. Senate Bill 8 banned doctors from performing such abortions unless they first stopped a fetus’ heart using another method. A number of abortion providers and women’s health groups, including Planned Parenthood and Whole Woman’s Health, challenged the law.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 27th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/nov/24/smoking-drinking-weight-nearly-half-cancer-deaths/

According to a new study, almost half of cancer diagnoses in the U.S. are linked to preventable causes, with smoking, excess body weight and alcohol consumption the most common risk factors. Based on federal data, researchers found that in two thousand fourteen, forty two percent of all diagnosis and forty five percent of all deaths were attributed to preventive risk factors. Researchers evaluated over one point five million cases of cancer and almost six hundred thousand  cancer deaths to understand their link to some of the most risky lifestyle factors.

Lung and colorectal cancer had the highest number of cases and deaths related to preventable risk factors, with one hundred eighty thousand nine hundred seventy four cases of lung cancer and one hundred thirty two thousand nine hundred sixty deaths. There were seventy six thousand nine hundred ten cases of colorectal cancer and twenty eight thousand two hundred nine deaths. Cigarette smoking was responsible for the highest proportion of cancer cases, the authors wrote, with ninteen percent of cases and twenty eight percent related to tobacco products. Being overweight was the second leading cause of diagnosis and death, at seven point eight percent and six point five percent respectively.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-parents-stress-meals/stressed-out-parents-less-likely-to-cook-homemade-meals-idUSKBN1DO2CM

A US study suggests that on days when parents feel stressed or depressed, kids are less likely to get homemade food for dinner.  Beyond just serving up more fast food and frozen dinners, parents are also more likely to pressure kids to clean their plates on days when they’re not in a great mood. “One potential explanation for these findings is that parents who have a stressful day at work, school or home or who feel depressed throughout the day may be overwhelmed and not feel like making a family meal, and so they opt for pre-prepared foods and make less homemade foods,” said lead study author Jerica Berge of the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis.
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For the study, researchers observed one hundred fifty children ages five to seven years at home with their families and used several methods to assess how parents’ moods influenced what foods went on the table. Among other things, researchers did home visits to observe meal planning and preparation and examined data from food diaries, surveys and interviews.
Most of the adult participants were mothers at thirty five years old on average. More than half worked at least part-time, and sixty one percent of them had no more than a high school diploma. Approximately half of the mothers were married, and sixty four percent of the households had two parents.

More than two-thirds of the families had a household income of less than thirty five thousand dollars a year. Overall, stress levels were low and depression was uncommon, the researchers reported online November twenty one in Pediatrics.
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With each one-unit increase in stress levels, parents were also forty five percent more likely to pressure kids to eat. Each one-unit increase in depression, meanwhile, was linked to forty two percent higher odds that parents would pressure kids to clean their plates. The study was small, and it wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove whether or how parents’ mood or mental health influences what kids eat. Even so, it offers fresh evidence of the connection between stress and eating behaviors, said Nancy Zucker, a psychologist and eating disorders specialist at Duke University.
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She added that just knowing that stress or depression might lead to less healthy meals isn’t enough on its own to help parents change what they put on the table.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/11/23/health/texas-abortion-law-struck-down/index.html

A federal judge has struck down Texas’ ban on a common second-trimester abortion procedure.
On Wednesday, US District Judge Lee Yeakel overturned Texas Senate Bill eight –which was passed earlier this year and banned doctors from performing dilation and evacuation abortions.
….
In a Dilation and Evacuation abortion, a doctor dilates the patient’s cervix before dismembering and removing the fetus. Senate Bill eight banned doctors from performing such abortions unless they first stopped a fetus’ heart using another method. A number of abortion providers and women’s health groups, including Planned Parenthood and Whole Woman’s Health, challenged the law. Banning the procedure — the most common type of abortion after fifteen weeks of pregnancy — means women must seek riskier alternatives, they argued.

Texas lawmakers passed Senate Bill eight in the spring, and Governor Greg Abbott signed it into law in June. It was due to go into effect in September, but Yeakel temporarily blocked Texas from enforcement while the law was being challenged in court.

Abortion rights activists fiercely opposed the law — and staged some dramatic protests against it. In March, when lawmakers were considering the bill, women showed up in the Texas Senate in white bonnets and blood-red cloaks, the uniform from Margaret Atwood’s nineteen eighty five dystopian novel, “The Handmaid’s Tale.” In the book, a new ultra-religious American government forces fertile women to carry leaders’ children (and to wear the conservative outfit).
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said Wednesday he will immediately appeal Yeakel’s decision.

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