The Health News USA January 29 2018

  • A flu outbreak sweeping the country is causing people and institutions to take precautions against its spread, including a Catholic diocese in New York state that has issued healthy guidelines for its churches and schools. According to the CDC, since early October, the influenza outbreak has been widespread in all states, except Hawaii.  At least 37 children across the nation have died from the flu this season.
  • A groundbreaking Australian study has found that parents are mistaken if they think giving their teens alcohol removes drinking-related risks. In many countries, parents provide alcohol to their underage kids as a way to introduce them to drinking carefully, and believe it will protect them from the harms of heavy drinking. But the practice appears to do more harm than good. The investigators found that young people who got alcohol from parents were more likely than other teens to also get it elsewhere.
  • Nearly 1 in 4 women have experienced serious physical violence at the hands of a partner. They often end up in the emergency room or the doctor’s office. But they don’t typically volunteer the reason for their injuries, and doctors don’t always ask about abuse in the home. That failure of communication means the patients may miss out on the help they need. Yet a growing number of health providers and anti-abuse agencies in California and around the country are collaborating to identify victims and get them help. More doctors now screen their patients for signs of abuse and more agencies place victims’ advocates inside health centers.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 29th of January 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/flu-outbreak-prompts-precautions-including-churches/story?id=52665337

A flu outbreak sweeping the country is causing people and institutions to take precautions against its spread, including a Catholic diocese in New York state that has issued healthy guidelines for its churches and schools.

In hopes of stopping the bug from spreading, the Diocese of Buffalo in New York has issued several directives, including suspending two practices during Mass: Sharing wine during Holy Communion and shaking hands as a gesture of peace during the service. Bishop Richard J. Malone issued the guidelines after the New York State Department of Health announced the number of influenza cases in the state spiked more than fifty percent last week.

Malone said in a statement to all one hundred sixty four parishes and fifty three schools in the Diocese of Buffalo:”The best way to prevent the spread of contagious diseases is to practice good hygiene, such as washing your hands frequently with soap and water.” The New York State Department of Health announced on Thursday that seven thousand seven hundred seventy nine new laboratory-confirmed influenza cases were reported to the state last week, an increase of fifty four percent from the previous week. State health officials said that
about one thousand seven hundred fifty nine people statewide were hospitalized with the flu last week.
….
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, since early October, the influenza outbreak has been widespread in all states, except Hawaii.  At least thirty seven children across the nation have died from the flu this season.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/parents-think-twice-before-giving-teens-alcohol-researchers-say/

A groundbreaking Australian study has found that parents are mistaken if they think giving their teens alcohol removes drinking-related risks. In many countries, parents provide alcohol to their underage kids as a way to introduce them to drinking carefully, and believe it will protect them from the harms of heavy drinking. But the practice appears to do more harm than good. The investigators found that young people who got alcohol from parents were more likely than other teens to also get it elsewhere.

….
For the study, Professor Richard Mattick’s team followed more than one thousand nine hundred Australian teens, whose ages ranged from about twelve to eighteen, over a six-year period. During those years, as teens got older, the proportion who got alcohol from mom and dad rose — from fifteen percent to fifty seven percent. The proportion with no access to alcohol fell from eighty one percent to twenty one percent.

By study’s end, eighty one percent of teens who got alcohol from both their parents and other people reported binge drinking (defined as having more than four drinks on a single occasion). That compared to sixty two percent of teens who got alcohol only from other people, and twenty five percent of those who got alcohol only from their parents.
….
Alcohol is the top risk factor for death and disability among  fifteen to twenty four years old worldwide, according to background information in a journal news release. In addition, the teen years are also the time when drinking problems are most likely to develop.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2018/01/28/hospitals-ideal-responding-domestic-abuse/1062211001/

Nearly one in four women have experienced serious physical violence at the hands of a partner. They often end up in the emergency room or the doctor’s office. But they don’t typically volunteer the reason for their injuries, and doctors don’t always ask about abuse in the home. That failure of communication means the patients may miss out on the help they need.

Yet a growing number of health providers and anti-abuse agencies in California and around the country are collaborating to identify victims and get them help. More doctors now screen their patients for signs of abuse and more agencies place victims’ advocates inside health centers. Education and counseling for people experiencing violence is also more widely available in clinics and hospitals. About four years ago, the East Los Angeles Women’s Center opened offices on the campus of L.A. County-USC, a busy public hospital. Since then, center staff members have trained more than two thousand five hundred doctors, nurses, social workers and others to identify victims of domestic violence. They also respond quickly to calls from the medical center’s emergency room, inpatient hospital and outpatient facilities to help patients in crisis.
….
Victims of abuse can suffer long-term health problems, including chronic pain, frequent headaches, depression, diabetes and asthma. And they have higher health costs than people who have not experienced abuse.

The foundation has funded nineteen partnerships between health centers and domestic violence agencies around the state, including the L.A. County-USC office of the East Los Angeles Women’s Center. Similar partnerships operate in Illinois, Maryland and other states. Last year, the East Los Angeles Women’s Center served six hundred victims of domestic violence at the L.A. County-USC hospital campus. Nearly one-third were homeless or couldn’t go back home for safety reasons. Advocates say that hospitals and clinics are ideal settings to respond to the needs of abused women.

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