The Health News United Kingdom August 4 2017

Overview

  • According to researchers the number of blind people across the world is set to triple within the next 4 decades. Researchers predict the number of people with sight problems will soar in the coming decades. Analysis of data from 188 countries suggests there are more than 200 million people with moderate to severe vision impairment.
  • Experts say that Britons’ attitudes to breastfeeding prevent mothers in the UK from nursing their babies for more than a few weeks. According to Unicef and the WHO, the UK has one of the lowest rates of breastfeeding in the world.
  • Sexual health services in England are “at a tipping point”, according to local councils in England, who say visits to clinics have increased while funding has been cut. The Local Government Association warns that patients could face longer waiting times. But the latest data shows diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections have fallen in the past year.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 4th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40806253

According to researchers, the number of blind people across the world is set to triple within the next four decades. Writing in Lancet Global Health, they predict cases will rise from thirty six million to one hundred fifteen million by two thousand fifty, if treatment is not improved by better funding. A growing ageing population is behind the rising numbers. Some of the highest rates of blindness and vision impairment are in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. The percentage of the world’s population with visual impairments is actually falling, according to the study. But because the global population is growing and more people are living well into old age, researchers predict the number of people with sight problems will soar in the coming decades. Analysis of data from one hundred eighty eight countries suggests there are more than two hundred million people with moderate to severe vision impairment.

Lead author Professor Rupert Bourne, from Anglia Ruskin University said that even mild visual impairment can significantly impact a person’s life. “For example, reducing their independence… as it often means people are barred from driving.” Blindness affects eleven point seven million people in South Asia, six point two million people in East Asia, three point five million people in South East Asia, more that four percent of sub-Saharan Africa’s population and less than zero point five of Western Europe’s population.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/attitudes-towards-breastfeeding-must-change-in-uk-a3600891.html

Britons’ attitudes to breastfeeding prevent mothers in the UK from nursing their babies for more than a few weeks, experts have said. The UK has one of the lowest rates of breastfeeding in the world, research by Unicef and the World Health Organisation shows.Just one in three babies – thirty four percent – are breastfed for the recommended six months in the UK compared to seven one percent in Norway. The shocking statistics sparked a call for Britons to change their attitudes to breastfeeding in a bid to improve babies’ mental and physical development.

Professor Neena Modi, RCPCH president, told the Guardian that many children in the UK found the practice “yukky”. She added that “society is ambivalent about women’s bodies” and called for schools to improve education about breastfeeding. Some new mums also believe their partners would be “uncomfortable” if they breastfed. Professor Modi said: “Perhaps many men feel discomforted because they grow up to regard the breast as a sexual object.”

She added: “If someone was selling rich middle class parents some wonderful new whatever to improve their children’s intellectual ability, it would probably sell like hot cakes. And breast milk is absolutely just that.” The call to change the country’s attitudes to the topic comes on the 25th anniversary of National Breastfeeding Week.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40802193

Sexual health services in England are “at a tipping point”, according to local councils in England, who say visits to clinics have increased while funding has been cut. The Local Government Association warns that patients could face longer waiting times. But the latest data shows diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections have fallen in the past year. The government said more than sixteen billion pounds was being invested in public health. Responsibility for public health in England has rested with local councils since two thousand thirteen – but the Local  

Government Association says it has not been given adequate resources to run proper services.

It points to budget cuts of more than five hundred million pounds – nearly ten percent  over the past two years. The overall public health budget is three point four billion pounds for two thousand seven to two thousand eighteen and councils spend around six hundred million pounds a year on sexual health services.

However, there is some positive news – new diagnoses of STIs, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia and genital warts, fell by four percent from two thousand fifteen to two thousand sixteen.

Chlamydia is the most common STI in the UK and is easily passed on during sex. It can be tested for by providing a urine sample or a vaginal swab. Council leaders say it is good news more people are taking responsibility for their sexual health, but they warn that higher numbers are turning up at clinics and putting a strain on resources.

 

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.