The Health News Australia January 20 2018

  • Health experts are concerned that a little-known sexually transmitted infection is becoming resistant to antibiotics — but say a simple test can point toward effective treatment options. It’s a bug with the unattractive name of mycoplasma genitalium, or MG for short, and many people have never heard of it. Experts said it could cause infertility and premature birth in pregnant women.
  • A Melbourne private hospital is trialling software developed in-house aimed at improving the pregnancy and birthing experience of expectant mothers, by offering a single, all-inclusive pregnancy resource. Cabrini Health is currently piloting Eve at its Malvern campus. All the information contained in Eve has been authored by Cabrini clinicians and midwives. Users can also chat with other users on a forum moderated by hospital midwives to ensure the discussions are free from clinically inaccurate or inappropriate content.
  • Carers warned not to leave people with disabilities in hot cars with extreme weekend heat predicted Two cases of people with a disability being left in hot cars this summer has prompted the New South Wales Ombudsman to issue a warning to carers and parents to take more precautions. The warning comes ahead of predictions of extreme temperatures over the weekend. Most cars in the study reached a critical temperature within about eight minutes on a typical Brisbane summer day.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th of January 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-18/mg-sexually-transmitted-superbug-youve-never-heard-of/9336042

Health experts are concerned that a little-known sexually transmitted infection is becoming resistant to antibiotics — but say a simple test can point toward effective treatment options.
It’s a bug with the unattractive name of mycoplasma genitalium, or MG for short, and many people have never heard of it. Experts said it could cause infertility and premature birth in pregnant women. Professor Suzanne Garland from Melbourne’s Royal Women’s Hospital said people infected with MG often had no symptoms.
….
Some men have no symptoms but can have pain when urinating. Women may also have no symptoms but some do report pain during sex or while passing urine. And same-sex couples face the same risk factors as heterosexual couples. Health experts say the big concern about MG is that it is becoming resistant to antibiotics. Professor Garland said: “It’s essentially acting like a superbug, with research showing at least fifty percent of people have a drug-resistant MG, limiting their treatment options.” The good news is there is now a simple test that can screen people for the condition and which treatments are likely to work.

The new test is covered by Medicare and will be rolled out to surgeries and clinics across Australia. Sexual health experts said it was difficult to get an accurate picture of how prevalent MG is. Professor Garland has stated that in sexual health clinics, ten to thirty five percent of people being tested have it.

http://www.healthcareit.com.au/article/australian-hospital-sees-big-potential-app-expectant-mothers

A Melbourne private hospital is trialling software developed in-house aimed at improving the pregnancy and birthing experience of expectant mothers, by offering a single, all-inclusive pregnancy resource. Cabrini Health is currently piloting Eve at its Malvern campus and Andrea Rindt, Nurse Director Women and Children, said the goal was to ensure that mothers-to-be had seamless communication with the maternity unit and a single source of evidence-based information.

She added: “Public hospitals benefit from the minimized disruption to the birth suite that would typically occur when expectant mothers call with questions about their pregnancy.”
All the information contained in Eve has been authored by Cabrini clinicians and midwives. Users can also chat with other users on a forum moderated by hospital midwives to ensure the discussions are free from clinically inaccurate or inappropriate content.

The software also features a contraction timer and algorithms to help users determine exactly when they should head to hospital, ideally reducing premature hospital presentations.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-17/disabled-people-being-left-in-hot-cars/9336606

Carers have been warned not to leave people with disabilities in hot cars with extreme weekend heat predicted. Two cases of people with a disability being left in hot cars this summer has prompted the New South Wales Ombudsman to issue a warning to carers and parents to take more precautions. The warning comes ahead of predictions of extreme temperatures over the weekend.

Ombudsman Michael Barnes said in a statement: “We have recently received two reports of people with disability being left unattended in vehicles that could easily have ended in tragedy.”
In both matters members of the public called the police who promptly intervened. In one case, a person with a disability was locked in a vehicle at midday for up to fifty minutes when the outside temperature was thirty eight degrees. Mister Barnes said: “The person needed to be transported to hospital to manage his distress and the risk to his health.”

Studies have shown that pets left in cars in hot temperatures can die within as little as six minutes. A two thousand nine study done by the Royal Automobile Club of Queensland

showed when the temperature was thirty two degrees outside it could get as high as seventy five degrees inside the cabin of a car in about two hours.

Most cars in the study reached a critical temperature within about eight minutes on a typical Brisbane summer day. Mister Barnes said the community was increasingly aware of the dangers of leaving children unattended in vehicles.

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