The Health News USA August 1 2017

Overview

  • U.S. hospitals have set a record for how quickly they open blocked arteries, averaging under 1 hour for the first time since these results have been tracked. More than 93% of patients now have their arteries opened within the recommended 90 minutes of arrival.
  • U.S. Magistrate Judge Susan Russ Walker has struck down Alabama’s one-of-a-kind law that enabled judges to put minors seeking abortions through a trial-like proceeding in which the fetus could get a lawyer and prosecutors could object to the pregnant girl’s wishes.
  • Alaska State Senator Shelley Hughes recently announced that she has been diagnosed with breast cancer but said she’s not going anywhere and promised to continue serving her district.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 1st of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

https://www.usnews.com/news/news/articles/2017-07-31/us-hospitals-set-record-for-fast-heart-attack-care

There’s never been a better time to be treated for a heart attack. U.S. hospitals have set a record for how quickly they open blocked arteries, averaging under one hour for the first time since these results have been tracked. More than ninety three percent of patients now have their arteries opened within the recommended ninety minutes of arrival.

“Things have definitely improved” from a decade ago, when less than half of heart attack patients were treated that fast, said Doctor Fred Masoudi, a University of Colorado cardiologist who led a recent report examining response times. It’s based on records from about eighty five percent of U.S. hospitals that do the artery procedure, angioplasty. Through a blood vessel in the groin or an arm, doctors guide a tube to the blockage causing the heart attack. They inflate a tiny balloon to flatten the clog, and leave behind a mesh tube called a stent to prop the artery open. The sooner blood flow is restored, the less chance of permanent damage.

The risk of dying goes up forty two percent if care is delayed even half an hour beyond the ninety minutes that U.S. guidelines say patients should be treated after arrival.

These are the warning signs of a heart attack: Discomfort in the center of the chest lasting more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain; pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach; shortness of breath, which might include breaking out in a cold sweat, or feelings of nausea or lightheadedness.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/judge-nixes-alabama-law-putting-pregnant-girls-trial-48948270

A federal judge has struck down Alabama’s one-of-a-kind law that enabled judges to put minors seeking abortions through a trial-like proceeding in which the fetus could get a lawyer and prosecutors could object to the pregnant girl’s wishes. Alabama legislators in two thousand fourteen changed the state’s process for girls who can’t or won’t get their parents’ permission for an abortion to obtain permission from a court instead.

The new law empowered the judge to appoint a guardian ad litem “for the interests of the unborn child” and invited the local district attorney to call witnesses and question the girl to determine whether she’s mature enough to decide. U.S. Magistrate Judge Susan Russ Walker sided Friday with the American Civil Liberties Union of Alabama, writing that the law unconstitutionally and impermissibly imposes “an undue burden on a minor in Alabama who seeks an abortion through a judicial bypass,” and violates the girl’s confidentiality by potentially bringing other people from her life into the process.

Both the judge and the ACLU said they were aware of no other state with such a law.

Every state requiring parental consent for abortions involving minors must also have a “judicial bypass” procedure so that girls can get a judge’s approval in a way that is effective, confidential, and expeditious, the ACLU said. The state had argued that the law was intended to allow a “meaningful” inquiry into the minor’s maturity and the process was still a “confidential, and expeditious option for a teenager who seeks an abortion without parental consent.”

The civil rights organization said it had the opposite effect, by enabling lawyers for the state or the fetus to subpoena the minor’s teacher, neighbor, relative or boyfriend to testify she’s too immature to choose an abortion, or that continuing the pregnancy would be in her best interest.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/alaska/articles/2017-07-30/state-senator-will-continue-to-work-despite-cancer-diagnosis

Alaska State Senator Shelley Hughes said she will stay on the job after recently announcing that she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Hughes’ doctor found something suspicious during a mammogram exam earlier this year, she told the Juneau Empire. The fifty nine-year-old Republican state senator from Wasilla is serving her first term. Hughes was supposed to return to the doctor in April but pushed it off until the extended regular session and two special sessions were over, she said. She posted a video on Facebook July twenty five announcing the diagnosis to her constituents to dispel rumors that had already begun circulating about her health.

Hughes shared how it felt to be a public official with a life-changing diagnosis.

“When you choose the life of a public servant, your life is not your own in the same kind of way,” she said. After her video, Hughes said she received hundreds of messages on social media from people offering their support. U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan and former Anchorage Representative and breast cancer survivor Cynthia Toohey also reached out to tell Hughes that she could beat it. Hughes said she’s not going anywhere and promised to continue serving her district.

 

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