The Health News – 5 June 2017

Overview:

• The Alchemy Chorus was jointly created by conductor Brian Triglone and the charity Alzheimer’s Australia late last year. Creating the choir to apply art therapy as a treatment was part of Alzheimer’s Australia’s strategic plan. The charity said research had proven that the arts enhanced the lives of people living with dementia and their carers.

• SHine SA’s Rapido program offers 10-minute “rapid tests” for clients who believe they may have contracted  HIV. More than 170 tests have been administered in the pilot program’s first year.

• Researchers at Flinders University in South Australia are trialling new imaging technology to better identify those at risk of sudden cardiac arrest. According to the Heart Foundation, which funded the study, one third of sudden cardiac deaths occur without any warning. The trial is part of a wider international project called CMR Guide, looking at scarring on the heart.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  5th of June 2017. Read by Wayne Bucklar. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-03/dementia-choir-changing-lives-for-the-better-through-song/8575780

Dementia choir changing lives for the better through song and friendship

Canberra’s first dementia-friendly choir is making a positive difference in the lives of people living with the disease, as well as their partners and carers.

The Alchemy Chorus was jointly created by conductor Brian Triglone and the charity Alzheimer’s Australia late last year.

“We wanted to develop something inclusive, they had to come with a carer or a partner,” Mr Triglone said.

Carer Don Aitken and his wife Bev are among up to 60 choir members who rehearse on Thursday nights.

Creating the choir to apply art therapy as a treatment was part of Alzheimer’s Australia’s strategic plan.

The charity said research had proven that the arts enhanced the lives of people living with dementia and their carers.

“We are using the arts instead of anti-psychotic medication,” Heather Clarke of Alzheimer’s Australia ACT said.

Ms Clarke said ongoing research was needed to assess art therapy as an alternative treatment for people living with Alzheimer’s.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-03/hiv-program-offering-quick-tests/8585726

Logan Bold has lost too many friends to HIV and AIDS.

He advocated for people living with HIV, as a volunteer and a professional, for more than 30 years.

Now with SHine SA’s Rapido program, Mr Bold is even giving out the tests.

There are approximately 25,000 people with HIV in Australia, and it is estimated that one in 10 are unaware they have the virus.

The Rapido program offers 10-minute “rapid tests” for clients who believe they may have contracted it.

Trained members of the gay community administer the finger prick and provide support as the blood sample develops.

SHine SA’s clinical coordinator Annie Braendler-Phillips said Rapido’s success had been driven by its “unique community-based model”.

“It’s a quick service, it’s convenient and it’s free of judgement — the feedback has been very positive,” she said.

“The numbers have slowly built up as word has gotten around that the service is available.”

More than 170 tests have been administered in the pilot program’s first year.

SHine SA is in talks with the State Government to try to secure funding for the Rapido program’s future.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-03/new-technology-offers-hope-people-risk-sudden-cardiac-death/8586498

New imaging technology offers hope for people at risk of sudden cardiac death

Every year, about 15,000 Australians die from sudden cardiac arrest but little is known about the condition.

Researchers at Flinders University in South Australia are trialling new imaging technology to better identify those at risk.

Heart attacks can increase the risk of sudden cardiac death and so can scarring on the heart.

Rebecca Perry from Flinders University said scarring could be difficult to see with current ultrasound imaging.

The new software being trialled by the university is known as strain imaging.

It works like current ultrasounds but initial findings are indicating the image quality is better.

According to the Heart Foundation, which funded the study, one third of sudden cardiac deaths occur without any warning.

South Australia’s Heart Foundation chief executive Imelda Lynch believes early identification is the key to prevention.

“We really want to get the message out there that prevention is better than cure,” she said.

The trial is part of a wider international project called CMR Guide, looking at scarring on the heart.

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