The Health News United Kingdom February 21 2018

  • According to new research that short children are at greater risk of suffering a stroke later in life. Being 2 to 3 inches shorter growing up raised the likelihood of the disease in both men and women. The discovery follows research by British scientists showing the vertically challenged are at increased risk of a heart attack. A previous study of more than a million adults found those who were 2 and a half inches taller than average were 6% and 10% less likely to die from an ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhage, respectively.
  • Scientists have taken the first steps towards what they say could become a new blood and urine test for autism. Their study tested children with and without the condition and found higher levels of protein damage in those with the disorder. The researchers said the tests could lead ultimately to the earlier detection of the condition, which can be difficult to diagnose. But experts expressed caution, saying such a test was still a long way off.
  • People on Twitter were outraged when McDonald’s announced it was removing the cheeseburger from their Happy Meal menus in the US.  However the move was slightly lost in translation, as people are still able to order the cheeseburger Happy Meal on request, it just won’t be advertised. The fast food chain stated that the changes form part of the global fast-food giant’s plans to have at least half of the Happy Meals listed around the world to contain 600 calories or fewer by 2022. In the UK, cheeseburgers have not been advertised on the menu for more than 10 years. But, parents can still order them for their kids.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 21st of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/02/15/stroke-risk-greater-children-short-growing-new-study1/

According to new research that short children are at greater risk of suffering a stroke later in life.
Being two to three inches shorter growing up raised the likelihood of the disease in both men and women. The discovery follows research by British scientists showing the vertically challenged are at increased risk of a heart attack. The latest findings were based on more than three hundred thousand Danish school children born between nineteen thirty and nineteen eighty nine. Those who were two inches shorter than average at seven, ten and thirteen were eleven percent more likely to have an ischaemic stroke as adults than their taller peers.

This is the most common form of the disease where a clot blocks blood and oxygen flow to the brain. Most cases were diagnosed between the ages of fifty five and seventy five. Men,who were short as children were also eleven percent more likely to suffer a stroke triggered by bleeding on the brain, called an intracerebral haemorrhage, however this did not apply to women. Strokes, which occur when the blood supply to the brain is cut off, are the third most common cause of premature death and a leading cause of disability in the UK. They affect fifty seven thousand people a year in England alone.

The average height of a thirteen year old child is five feet three with a seven year old measuring around four feet. A previous study of more than a million adults found those who were two and a half inches taller than average were six and ten percent less likely to die from an ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhage, respectively.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43085023

Scientists have taken the first steps towards what they say could become a new blood and urine test for autism. Their study tested children with and without the condition and found higher levels of protein damage in those with the disorder. The researchers said the tests could lead ultimately to the earlier detection of the condition, which can be difficult to diagnose. But experts expressed caution, saying such a test was still a long way off.

Autism affects behaviour and particularly social interaction but it is difficult to spot and is not usually diagnosed before the age of two, and often much later. Currently, there are no biological tests that can spot the condition, which is diagnosed through behavioural assessments by clinicians. For this new study, published in the Molecular Autism journal, researchers looked for chemical differences in the blood and urine of thirty eight autistic children and thirty one children without the condition, all aged between five and twelve.

In those with autism they found higher levels of protein damage – particularly in the blood plasma – which they said were associated with ill health. Doctor Naila Rabbani, from the University of Warwick, who led the study, told the BBC the tests could ultimately be used by doctors to diagnose autism earlier in childhood by detecting these markers.
….
Doctor James Cusack, director of science at the UK autism research charity Autistica, said: “This study may give us clues about why autistic people are different but it does not provide a new method for diagnosis. It is far too early for that.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/mcdonalds-cheeseburger-happy-meal_uk_5a869ea8e4b05c2bcac98329?utm_hp_ref=uk-health

People on Twitter were outraged when McDonald’s announced it was removing the cheeseburger from their Happy Meal menus in the US.  However the move was slightly lost in translation, as people are still able to order the cheeseburger Happy Meal on request, it just won’t be advertised. The fast food chain stated that the changes form part of the global fast-food giant’s plans to have at least half of the Happy Meals listed around the world to contain six hundred calories or fewer by two thousand twenty two. In the UK, cheeseburgers have not been advertised on the menu for more than ten years. But, parents can still order them for their kids.  

A McDonald’s UK spokesperson said in a statement: “We have pioneered an extensive salt and sugar reduction programme, and subsequently the average Happy Meal consumed in the UK last year contained nineteen point three percent less salt, nine point four percent less saturated fat, and thirteen point five percent less sugar, compared with the average Happy Meal sold in two thousand six.”The spokesperson told HuffPost UK the move to not advertise the cheeseburger was made to ensure they were offering choice, but also to lead to a “reduction in salt and sugar” in the meals people were buying.  

They added that the Happy Meals meals advertised in the chain are all six hundred calories or below.  For parents interested in the nutritional value of their kids’ food at McDonald’s, they can use the UK nutritional calculator to find out how many calories are in each meal. A cheeseburger has three hundred calories and one point six grams of salt. This is compared to the hamburger which has two hundred fifty calories and one point two grams of salt. The nuggets have one hundred seventy three calories and zero point thirty four grams of salt.

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