The Health News Australia October 27 2017

  • Babies who die from SIDS are low in a brain chemical called Substance P that controls heads and neck movement, meaning they can’t shift out of dangerous positions. A breakthrough Australian study has shown that babies who die of SIDS typically lack a brain chemical that helps control head and neck movement, leaving them unable to move out of life-threatening positions.
  • Heavy reliance on devices is responsible for a shift in how we regulate our emotions. Psychologists could consider a person’s over-reliance on their phones as a “safety-seeking behaviour” which reduces anxiety in the moment.  But over time, safety behaviours actually feed anxiety because they prevent people from realising their fear has no basis once the situation has actually unfolded, or that it is something they’re able to cope with.
  • Fewer Australian women are expected to require surgical treatment to prevent cervical cancer after doctors switch to a new screening test for the virus that can cause the disease. The new test for HPV will replace the traditional Pap smear on December 1 as part of an attempt to improve early detection of cervical cancer and save more women’s lives.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 27th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/neonatal/39/news/aap/australian-researchers-makes-sids-breakthrough/2967/

Babies who die from sudden infant death syndrome  are low in a brain chemical that controls heads and neck movement, meaning they can’t shift out of dangerous positions. A breakthrough Australian study has shown that babies who die of SIDS typically lack a brain chemical that helps control head and neck movement, leaving them unable to move out of life-threatening positions. The findings could soon lead to screening tests to identify babies most at risk of SIDS.

University of Adelaide Professor Roger Byard says a crucial part of the SIDS puzzle has now been solved. He and his team tested brain samples from babies who died of SIDS and found that in the vast majority of cases they had much lower levels of substance P. Substance P is a chemical in the back of the brain that controls a range of functions, including the response to low-oxygen situations such as the ones babies can get into when they roll onto their tummies.
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Professor Byard said the vast majority of brain samples he and his colleagues, Professor Robert Vink and Doctor Fiona Bright, examined were short of substance P. That was particularly true for boys, who account for twice as many SIDS deaths as girls.
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Professor Byard also said a landmark US study, later replicated by his team using Australian samples, had revealed reduced levels of serotonin in the brainstems of SIDS babies. The Substance P study was carried out in collaboration with Harvard Medical School and the Boston Children’s Hospital.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-25/smartphone-dealing-with-uncertainty-and-anxiety-in-digital-age/9085194

Our culture has changed immensely as a result of the smartphone. We can get reassurance for every doubt just by texting our friends. We can feel approval by getting “likes” on our Instagram post or Facebook status. But heavy reliance on devices is responsible for a shift in how we regulate our emotions. A by-product of this instant communication is a diminished ability to sit with uncertainty. Intolerance to uncertainty has been shown to underlie a range of psychological difficulties.

Psychologists could consider a person’s over-reliance on their phones as a “safety-seeking behaviour” which reduces anxiety in the moment. But over time, safety behaviours actually feed anxiety because they prevent people from realising their fear has no basis once the situation has actually unfolded, or that it is something they’re able to cope with. This is particularly problematic for children whose ability to build resilience may be disrupted by such behaviours. Unfortunately some apps, such as Messenger or the “read” message setting of the iPhone, tell the sender whether the other person is online or has read their message.

We need to retrain ourselves, and our teenagers, to stand up to such clear manipulation of their FOMO or the Fear of Missing Out and fear of rejection. Learning to face uncertainty is essential to managing our mental health. Research, exploring groups of people with mental illness, has documented individuals suffering from a range of mental illnesses are less able to sit with uncertainty compared to those who do not have these diagnoses. There’s fascinating differences in the way we use our phones, as revealed by the ABC’s Science Week survey. And the more a person is intolerant to uncertainty, the more they are likely to be diagnosed with a greater number of mental health conditions. This has been observed in adults. The unpublished research has found the same association exists for children.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/10/25/fewer-australian-women-expected-to-require-surgery-thanks-to-hpv-test_a_23255305/?utm_hp_ref=au-health

Fewer Australian women are expected to require surgical treatment to prevent cervical cancer after doctors switch to a new screening test for the virus that can cause the disease. The new test for the human papillomavirus or HPV will replace the traditional Pap smear on December one as part of an attempt to improve early detection of cervical cancer and save more women’s lives. Previous research has highlighted a host of benefits offered by the HPV test, including how it is significantly better at detecting potential pre-cancerous cells than the traditional Pap smear and will lower cervical cancer mortality rates by at least twenty percent.

Researchers at the Cancer Council New South Wales  are now also predicting the HPV test will lead to an overall drop in the need for women with precancerous abnormalities to undergo surgery, the most common treatment currently available to prevent cervical cancer developing.
They predict that women who have received the HPV vaccine under a national program that began in high schools in two thousand seven will have a thirteen percent lower risk of surgery after the switch is made to HPV tests.
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Cancer Council NSW research director Professor Karen Canfell says there is no need for women who haven’t received the HPV vaccine to worry, largely because most young women have had the chance to be immunised in the past decade.
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Under the new national cervical cancer screening program, the HPV test will eliminate the need for women to have a Pap smear every two years. Women from the age of twenty five, instead of eighteen, will instead undergo a HPV test every five years.

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