The Health News USA April 17 2018

  • Just over half of U.S. adults back single-payer health care, according to a poll recently released that says the idea of government-run health care is still a partisan issue but finds favor with enough independents to produce a slim majority of public support.The Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that 51% of adults support the idea and 43% percent oppose it.
  • A joint study by Northwestern University and the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom found “night owls” — people who prefer to stay up later — had a higher mortality rate than people who go to sleep early. Researchers focused on more than 433 thousand people between the ages of 38 and 73. They asked participants whether they were a morning or evening person, and to what degree (moderate or definite). The study then tracked deaths up to 6 and a half years later.
  • According to a new study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the percentage of young people with dental cavities in the United States dropped from 50% in 2012 to just over forty three percent in 2016. Although the overall trend is a positive one, young members of minority communities continue to have the highest number of cavities as well as the highest number of untreated cavities.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 17th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/apr/13/poll-slim-majority-supports-single-payer-health-ca/

Just over half of U.S. adults back single-payer health care, according to a poll recently released that says the idea of government-run health care is still a partisan issue but finds favor with enough independents to produce a slim majority of public support.The Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that fifty one percent of adults support the idea and forty three percent oppose it.  Health care was a leading political issue during the past year, as liberal groups took to the streets to beat back President Trump’s to repeal and replace Obamacare.

The poll said sixty one percent of people who described themselves as a “rallygoer” would like to go beyond the two thousand ten Affordable Care Act and see a national health care plan that covers everyone. Senator Bernard Sanders, Vermont independent, is pushing a “Medicare for all” single-payer bill that’s been cosponsored by more than a dozen Senate Democrats, including party frontrunners for the two thousand twenty presidential nomination.
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About three in four Democrats — seventy four percent — told The Washington Post-Kaiser they support a single-payer plan.
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Eight in ten Republicans told pollsters they oppose single-payer health care. Independents were the difference-maker, with fifty four percent supporting the plan and forty percent opposing.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2018/04/12/night-owls-sleep-late-death-risk-study/510087002/

A joint study by Northwestern University and the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom found “night owls” — people who prefer to stay up later — had a higher mortality rate than people who go to sleep early. Researchers focused on more than four hundred thirty three thousand people between the ages of thirty eight and seventy three. They asked participants whether they were a morning or evening person, and to what degree (moderate or definite). The study then tracked deaths up to six and a half years later.

The research found “night owls” had a ten percent greater risk of dying than morning people. The study also found evening types also had higher risks for conditions such as diabetes or psychological disorders.

Co-lead author Kristen Knutson, associate professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine said in a statement:  “Night owls trying to live in a morning lark world may have health consequences for their bodies.” The inclination to live as a night owl or morning person might not be by choice. A two thousand seventeen study claims those tendencies could be linked to your genes. Knutson said researchers want to test whether night owls can convert to morning people, and if overall health improves. In the meantime, society could play a role in catering to a person’s morning or evening preferences.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/04/13/health/prevalence-of-cavities-study/index.html

According to a new study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the percentage of young people with dental cavities in the United States dropped from fifty percent in two thousand twelve to just over forty three percent in two thousand sixteen. Although the overall trend is a positive one, young members of minority communities continue to have the highest number of cavities as well as the highest number of untreated cavities.

According to the study, the highest prevalence of total and untreated cavities was found among Hispanic and non-Hispanic black youth. Hispanic youths had the most cavities at fifty two percent compared with black at forty four point three percent, Asian at forty two point six percent and white at thirty nine percent youths. Black youths had the most untreated cavities at seventeen point one percent compared with Hispanic at thirteen point five percent, white at eleven point seven percent and Asian at ten point five percent youths.

The American Dental Association has tracked the historical trend of racial disparity in oral health care — and its correlation to income levels — over several decades. It has also found that the prevalence has gone down but is still highest in Hispanic and black youth.
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Doctor Roseann Mulligan, associate dean and professor at the University of Southern California’s Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry cited several reasons why Hispanic and black youth might have the highest prevalence of total and untreated cavities, including socioeconomic status, education level and access to health care. The CDC study states that
the prevalence of total dental cavities decreased as family income levels increased, from fifty one point eight percent for youth from families living below the federal poverty level to thirty four point two percent for youth from families with income levels greater than three hundred percent of the federal poverty level.

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