The Health News United Kingdom August 5 2017

Overview

  • The NHS in England has announced it will finally give people a drug to dramatically reduce the risk of being infected with HIV, from next month. The health service had previously fought against paying for Prep and even took the issue to court, unsuccessfully, last year. Prep (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is a daily pill that disables HIV before it gets a stranglehold in the body.
  • From October 1, Brussels is abolishing quotas which control how much sugar can be produced across Europe and scrapping the system which keeps prices high. The EU produces half the world’s beet sugar. Across Europe farmers and sugar producers have been ramping up for the October free-for-all.
  • A legal dispute over who pays for nurses delivering social care in residential homes in Wales has been won by Welsh councils. Health boards and 21 councils could not agree over who should pay when a person needs certain healthcare – but not around the clock.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40814242

The National Health Service in England has announced it will finally give people a drug to dramatically reduce the risk of being infected with HIV, from next month. The health service had previously fought against paying for Prep and even took the issue to court, unsuccessfully, last year. The drug will be given to ten thousand people in a ten million pound trial lasting three years. The Terrence Higgins Trust said it was “crucial” the NHS delivered plans to offer the protection routinely. Prep or pre-exposure prophylaxis is a daily pill that disables HIV before it gets a stranglehold in the body. Trials suggest it can cut the risk of being infected by up to eighty six percent. People buying the drug privately has been linked to the first fall in new infections in gay men. Scotland has already announced it will make Prep available on the NHS to people at risk of HIV. And in Wales, the government is also trialling the drug.

Sexual health clinics in London, Brighton, Manchester, Liverpool and Sheffield are expected to be the first to offer Prep to high-risk people, starting September. The rest of the country will take part by April two thousand eighteen. Simon Stevens, the chief executive of NHS England said that this major new intervention should complement and supercharge the wide-ranging and increasingly successful effort to prevent HIV. It’s another milestone in more than three decades’ worth of progress in tackling one of humanity’s major health challenges. NHS England had fought not to offer the drug, arguing responsibility for paying for it should fall to local authorities not the NHS. The trial will aim to answer questions about how Prep should be offered on a wide scale across England.

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/836756/Brexit-EU-imports-obesity-crisis-UK-European-Union-cheap-sugar-farming-policy

From October one, Brussels is abolishing quotas which control how much sugar can be produced across Europe and scrapping the system which keeps prices high.  An extra two million tons of cheap sugar a year are predicted to be produced. In Whitehall there is tension between the Department of Health, which is spending millions advising people to eat less sugar, and the agriculture ministry Defra, which sees the lifting of controls as a valuable opportunity for British farmers to export more. But experts have told the Daily Express that the flood of cheap sugar will make a nonsense of public health policy. Professor Jack Winkler, of London Metropolitan University said that you could not design a more unhealthy sugar policy if you tried and this regime will produce more sugar at a cheaper price in the midst of an obesity epidemic when health authorities everywhere are urging us to eat less of it.

The European Union produces half the world’s beet sugar. Across Europe farmers and sugar producers have been ramping up for the October free-for-all. In France planting of sugar beet is up by an estimated twenty percent. Public Health England has begun an extensive reformulation plan to cut twenty per cent of sugar from the food we eat by two thousand twenty, potentially cutting two hundred thousand tons of sugar from UK diets.”


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-politics-40802237

A legal dispute over who pays for nurses delivering social care in residential homes in Wales has been won by Welsh councils. Health boards and twenty one councils could not agree over who should pay when a person needs certain healthcare – but not around the clock.

The Supreme Court has now ruled the boards had misinterpreted the law and that the parties should renegotiate. Care Forum Wales claimed the row meant homes are owed thirty million pounds in unpaid fees. The care sector industry body said it was a “national scandal” that homes had to endure the dispute and that the nub of the case came to who should pay a twenty pound a week fee for nursing care provided by care homes.The organisation claimed the court costs are upwards of one million pounds.

The Welsh NHS Confederation, which represents Welsh health boards, said it accepts the ruling. It was care homes themselves that had begun legal proceedings in two thousand fourteen, eventually securing a judicial review which ruled in their favour.The health boards won an earlier appeal but following a further challenge the Supreme Court has now gone in favour of the local councils. The row was prompted after health boards had decided not to fund nurses for so-called “non-nursing care time” which includes social care like dressing and washing patients, and stand-by time, paid breaks and time spent receiving supervision.This resulted in a weekly payment which was twenty seven point thirty three pounds lower than it would have been had that time been included and prompted a legal challenge from care home operators, which was later taken over by all Welsh councils.

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