The Health News United Kingdom October 19 2017

  • According to research done by BBC, the performance of hospitals across the UK has slumped with targets for cancer, A&E and planned operations now being missed en masse. Nationally England, Wales and Northern Ireland have not hit 1 of their 3 key targets for 18 months. Only Scotland has had any success in the past 12 months – hitting its A&E target three times.
  • The Duchess of Cornwall has spoken of the “agonising” death suffered by her mother and grandmother as she warned young people to build up bone strength to avoid the same fate. Statistics indicate that half of all women and one in five men develop osteoporosis after the age of 50. The NOS advises eating most dairy products, green leafy vegetables, broccoli and baked beans to gain healthy amounts of calcium and vitamin D.
  • A study suggests that an increase in the price of sugary drinks in restaurants and the offer of healthier alternatives could encourage customers to cut back on sugar. Consuming too many sugary soft drinks has been linked to a higher risk of serious health problems such as obesity, type-2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and tooth decay.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 19th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41656667

According to research done by BBC, the performance of hospitals across the UK has slumped with targets for cancer, A and E and planned operations now being missed en masse. Nationally England, Wales and Northern Ireland have not hit one of their three key targets for eighteen months. Only Scotland has had any success in the past twelve months – hitting its Accident and Emergency target three times. Ministers accepted growing demand had left the NHS struggling to keep up as doctors warned patients were suffering. The findings are being revealed as the BBC launches its online NHS Tracker project, which allows people to see how their local service is performing on three key waiting time targets: Four-hour A and E waits, sixty-two day cancer care and planned operations and treatment.

The BBC has looked at performance nationally as well as locally across the one hundred thirty five hospital trusts in England and twenty six health boards in the rest of the UK. Locally there is just one service in the whole of the UK – run by Luton and Dunstable NHS Trust – which has managed to hit all three targets each time over the past twelve months. Hospital staff the BBC has talked to have described how shortages of doctors and nurses, a lack of money and inadequate room in A and E departments in particular was making it difficult to see patients quickly enough. While overall the vast majority of patients are still being seen in time, the BBC investigation shows how declining performance is affecting patients. For example, the chances of not being seen in four hours in A and E has actually more than doubled in the past four years, with one in nine patients now waiting longer than that.
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Scotland is the only part of the UK to hit its targets during the last twelve months, but has only managed to hit that three times over the summer in A and E when pressures tend to be at their lowest. Northern Ireland is failing to hit its targets despite making it easier to hit the goal for planned operations and care. Since March two thousand fifteen it has gradually reduced the target from eighty percent to fifty five percent but has still not hit it.

The number of A and E visits made each year across the UK has risen by a fifth in four years to top thirty million, while the number of cancer cases has risen by more than a quarter to top one hundred seventy thousand.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/17/duchess-recalls-agonising-deaths-mother-grandmother-bone-disease/

The Duchess of Cornwall has spoken of the “agonising” death suffered by her mother and grandmother as she warned young people to build up bone strength to avoid the same fate.
President of the National Osteoporosis Society, the Duchess recalled the “pain and ignominy” of the disease which claimed both family members, Rosalind Shand and Sonia Keppel.

In a message to her younger self, she counselled eating a healthy diet with lots of vitamin D and taking plenty of exercise to ward off the bone-weakening condition. The Duchess said that as a young woman she had been “blissfully unaware” of the causes and devastating effects of osteoporosis, but warned that it is too late to attempt to build up bone strength beyond the age of thirty. The disease is suffered by approximately three million people in the UK, disproportionately affecting women. It weakens bones, making them more liable to fracture, and in old people it can cause a “dowager” stoop.

After the age of thirty it is no longer possible to build bone strength, but only to maintain what strength already exists. Statistics indicate that half of all women and one in five men develop osteoporosis after the age of fifty. Losing bone density is a normal part of the ageing process, but women are particularly susceptible due to the menopause. The Duchess of Cornwall became president of the National Osteoporosis Society in nineteen ninety four.

The NOS advises eating most dairy products, green leafy vegetables, broccoli and baked beans to gain healthy amounts of calcium and vitamin D. The organisation said that weight-bearing exercise is also essential for bone health.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41637931

A study suggests that an increase in the price of sugary drinks in restaurants and the offer of healthier alternatives could encourage customers to cut back on sugar. In Jamie’s Italian restaurants, sales of sugar-sweetened soft drinks declined by nine percent following a ten p price rise. The chain also redesigned the menu and explained that money from the levy would go to charity. Experts said more research was needed to pin down what measures worked.
Consuming too many sugary soft drinks has been linked to a higher risk of serious health problems such as obesity, type-two diabetes, heart disease, stroke and tooth decay.

To help tackle obesity, the UK government is introducing a tax on high-sugar soft drinks such as Coca-Cola and Pepsi in April two thousand eighteen – and Jamie Oliver had been vocal in his support of the plan. This study, in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, analysed sales of sugary non-alcoholic beverages at thirty seven of Jamie Oliver’s national chain of restaurants after a ten p levy was introduced in September two thousand fifteen.
Low-sugar fruit spritzers (fruit juice mixed with water) were also added to the menu, which clearly explained why the levy was being introduced.

After twelve weeks, sales of sugary drinks per customer had declined by eleven percent, and after six months they had gone down by nine point three percent. But the study did not look at any other restaurant chains to compare sales figures. The study also showed there was a general decrease in the number of soft drinks sold per customer, including diet drinks and bottled waters. The researchers, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Cambridge, said more people could have chosen tap water, but these figures had not been recorded. Sales of fruit juices had increased by twenty two percent six months after the changes were introduced.

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