The Health News Australia November 15 2017

  • Letters from doctors excusing children from immunisation will no longer be accepted by Victorian child care centres and kindergartens, as the Government moves to toughen its “No Jab, No Play” laws. The changes mean immunisation history statements from the Australian Immunisation Register will be the only documents accepted as evidence of a medical reason for a child not to be immunised.
  • A new app called SunSmart that makes UV rays visible to the human eye has been launched to help people protect their skin from sunburn this summer.  According to a survey by Cancer Council Victoria, UV radiation is the major cause of skin cancer but many of us rely on heat and humidity as a guide to sun protection. The survey found twenty two per cent of young Victorian adults wrongly selected temperature as the most useful measure to calculate sunburn risk for the day.
  • Experts have warned that Australia’s health system risks being buried by an “avalanche” of gestational diabetes.  The stark message for was made today on World Diabetes Day and highlights the threat to thousands of mothers and babies but also the potential risk to hundreds of thousands. Figures from Diabetes Australia show that over the past 12 months 38,000 pregnant women have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-15/child-vaccination-exemption-letters-from-gps-no-longer-accepted/9151768

Letters from doctors excusing children from immunisation will no longer be accepted by Victorian child care centres and kindergartens, as the Government moves to toughen its “No Jab, No Play” laws. The changes mean immunisation history statements from the Australian Immunisation Register will be the only documents accepted as evidence of a medical reason for a child not to be immunised. Victorian Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos said, under legislation being introduced to Parliament, other medical documents would be rejected.
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Debate around immunisation focuses on ‘vaccine refusers’ but experts say we cannot ignore the other reasons children miss out on vaccines. Miss Mikakos said federal authorities were currently investigating doctors helping patients get around immunisation rules.Victoria’s No Jab, No Play legislation ban unvaccinated children from attending child care and kindergarten.
In August, Melbourne doctor John Piesse agreed to have his licence to practice suspended for issuing medical exemption certificates for children. At the time he said what he was doing was “totally legal”. His practice in Mitcham was raided in September by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) and police officers.

Federal Government records from two thousand fifteen showed about thirty thousand Australian children — about one point thirty four per cent — were granted “conscientious objection” exemptions from vaccination. Miss Mikakos also said the changes would make the process much easier for early childhood learning services, who will now only have to deal with one set of documents for each child.
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Opposition Leader Matthew Guy said he supported any changes to boost important vaccinations. Miss Mikakos said overall rates of immunisation had increased in the two years since the No Jab, No Play laws were introduced. “I’m pleased to say Victoria has now hit ninety five per cent of five-year-old children being immunised, which is a very positive outcome,” she said.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/public-health/50/news/aap/a-new-app-has-been-launched-to-help-people-protect-their-skin-from-sunburn/3012/

A new app that makes UV rays visible to the human eye has been launched to help people protect their skin from sunburn this summer. According to a survey by Cancer Council Victoria,
UV radiation is the major cause of skin cancer but many of us rely on heat and humidity as a guide to sun protection. SunSmart Manager Heather Walker says that’s  because UV rays can’t be detected by human senses.

She added: “As a result, we usually don’t realise how strong the rays are until the damage has already been done.”

The survey found twenty two per cent of young Victorian adults wrongly selected temperature as the most useful measure to calculate sunburn risk for the day. Just sixty one per cent correctly identified UV level as the best measure to determine sunburn risk. The SunSmart app – seeUV- developed at Deakin University, uses augmented reality technology and real time data from the bureau of meteorology to provide a visual image of hidden UV and alert users when it’s at dangerous levels. A UV Index reading of three to five signifies moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. At this level people are advised to stay in shade during the middle of the day when the sun is strongest. The seeUV app also has a selfie mode that uses the same augmented reality technology to generate the long-term consequences of UV damage on a person’s skin, such as premature ageing, wrinkles and sunspots.

https://www.9news.com.au/national/2017/11/14/12/21/health-experts-warn-of-gestational-diabetes-avalanche-in-australia

Experts have warned that Australia’s health system risks being buried by an “avalanche” of gestational diabetes.  The stark message made on World Diabetes Day highlights the threat to thousands of mothers and babies but also the potential risk to hundreds of thousands. Figures from Diabetes Australia show that over the past twelve months thirty eight thousand pregnant women have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. It is now the fastest growing type of the disease in Australia, and has affected two hundred thousand  women over the last decade. But that figure is projected to balloon over the next ten years.
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Professor Greg Johnson, CEO of Diabetes Australia, warned hundreds of thousands of women and potentially their children are at risk. He said:  “Latest projections show that over the next decade more than five hundred thousand women could develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy.” Professor Johnson said diabetes in pregnancy was a major priority in the Australian National Diabetes Strategy two thousand sixteen to two thousand twenty but health experts are still waiting on action by the federal, state and territory governments.

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Meanwhile, the number of younger Queenslanders being diagnosed with Type two diabetes is rising. National Diabetes Services Scheme figures show forty five Queensland children under the age of sixteen have been registered with the condition, which is largely triggered by lifestyle factors.….

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