The Health News United Kingdom November 28 2017

  • NHS England is urging parents to vaccinate “super-spreader” children against flu so grandparents and other vulnerable relatives will be less at risk over the Christmas period. Flu vaccines administered through a nasal spray rather than an injection have been rolled out this autumn for 2 and 3-year-olds, and children in reception class and years 1 to 4 in primary school. Children are super-spreaders because of the greater likelihood of them contracting flu at nursery or school, where germs are passed on at a rapid rate.
  • Earlier this year, a report published by the Neurological Alliance found that that services to diagnose, treat and provide ongoing care are failing patients across the spectrum of neurological disorders. It surveyed 7,000 neurology patients in England about their experience of getting access to care and treatment. It found that 23% waited more than 12 months to see a neurological specialist after their first visit to a GP.
  • According to a new research, 2 in 3 cases of pneumonia are being missed by GPs. The study, led by the National Institute for Health Research, also found some doctors are mistaking symptoms of more common viral infections for pneumonia, prescribing unnecessary antibiotics and potentially contributing to antibiotic resistance. Considering this, the researchers suggested GPs should complete four measures in order to better detect pneumonia and avoid over-prescribing medication.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 28th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/nov/27/nhs-vaccinations-flu-children-nasal-spray

NHS England is urging parents to vaccinate “super-spreader” children against flu so grandparents and other vulnerable relatives will be less at risk over the Christmas period.
Flu vaccines administered through a nasal spray rather than an injection have been rolled out this autumn for two and three-year-olds, and children in reception class and years one to four in primary school. Children are super-spreaders because of the greater likelihood of them contracting flu at nursery or school, where germs are passed on at a rapid rate. According to the latest figures, only eighteen percent of school-age children have had the nasal spray immunisation.

Professor Keith Willett, NHS England’s medical director for acute care, said: “Flu can be spread more easily by children, especially to vulnerable relatives such as older grandparents, those with heart or lung conditions and pregnant family members.’’
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With less than a month until Christmas, the NHS is urging parents to book their children in for the free vaccination to help curb infection over the festive season, when family get-togethers can spread the infection. Earlier this month, the health service regulator, NHS Improvement, warned that the NHS was in an “extremely challenging” position with winter approaching because hospitals have failed to free up enough beds. NHSI said that as a result, this winter is likely to prove difficult for hospitals. There were four hundred thousand additional Accident and Emergency attendances between November two thousand sixteen and February, bringing the total to more than seven point five million, an increase of five point six percent on the previous year.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42112513

Earlier this year, a report published by the Neurological Alliance found that that services to diagnose, treat and provide ongoing care are failing patients across the spectrum of neurological disorders. It surveyed seven thousand neurology patients in England about their experience of getting access to care and treatment. It found that twenty three percent waited more than twelve months to see a neurological specialist after their first visit to a general practitioner. Suzanne Dobson, chair of the alliance, said: “The impact is huge. For a few, it will mean that they didn’t get treatment earlier enough and so bits of their conditions that many have been reversible, manageable, get worse during the period and they can’t get that back.”
Meanwhile, a separate report published in March by the Association of British Neurologists (ABN) found that the likelihood of a patient with a neurological problem being seen by a neurologist varies dramatically depending on where they are admitted.
It found one in five UK hospitals have access to neurologists on three days a week or less.
It also found that forty two percent of patients saw a GP five or more times before seeing a neurological specialist. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence  has recognised this as an issue and in January is due to publish new guidance for the health professionals like GPs to help them to better recognise neurological conditions. The draft guidance says “a lack of support” to help non-specialists identify when a referral is needed, has led to “delays in referral for people with treatable or potentially serious neurological conditions”. Two years ago a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the wide variations in neurology care in England. The committee’s chair, Meg Hillier, Member of Parliament said despite their warnings the situation had  not improved.

A Department of Health spokesperson added: “We spend over three billion pounds every year on neurological services and the number of neurologists in the NHS has increased by thirty seven percent since two thousand ten.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/two-in-three-cases-of-pneumonia-missed-by-gps-heres-the-symptoms-you-need-to-know_uk_5a1697d5e4b064948072fee4?utm_hp_ref=uk-health-news

According to a new research, two in three cases of pneumonia are being missed by general practitioners. The study, led by the National Institute for Health Research, also found some doctors are mistaking symptoms of more common viral infections for pneumonia, prescribing unnecessary antibiotics and potentially contributing to antibiotic resistance. Considering this, the researchers suggested GPs should complete four measures in order to better detect pneumonia and avoid over-prescribing medication: testing for fever, high pulse rate, cracky breath sounds and low oxygen levels. In light of the research, Doctor Clare Morrison, GP for online doctor  service MedExpress, says the public shouldn’t panic. She added: “I think it’s important to remember that GPs are human beings and it can be tough to always get it right. This is why, in my experience, they tend to go the extra mile and offer antibiotics – this has been criticised – but it is because they are concerned about missing something important.”
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According to the NHS, pneumonia symptoms can develop suddenly over twenty four to forty eight hours, or they may come on more slowly over several days. Common symptoms include: a cough (which can lead to the production of thick, coloured phlegm), difficulty in breathing, rapid heartbeat, fever, generally feeling unwell, sweating and shivering, loss of appetite or chest pain.
Less common symptoms include: coughing up blood, headaches, fatigue, nausea or vomiting, wheezing, joint and muscle pain, and confusion.
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Pneumonia affects around eight in one thousand adults each year and the majority of cases can be treated successfully at home if doctors only suspect mild pneumonia.

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