The Health News United Kingdom November 24 2017

  • Different types of alcoholic drink change and shape your mood in different ways, says a study into drinking and emotions. According to researchers, spirits may make you feel angry, sexy or tearful, while red wine or beer may make you feel relaxed. Drinking spirits was more likely than all other drink types to be associated with feelings of aggression, illness, restlessness and tearfulness.
  • A major study is to look at whether talking therapy can help cancer survivors cope with fears of a relapse and speed up their recovery following treatment for the disease. Researchers at Queen Mary University of London will examine whether offering help with emotional issues, concerns about work or fears of relapse can improve long-term outcomes.
  • Researchers believe that children’s time spent staring at the television, smartphones and tablets should be limited to 90 minutes a day to stop them from becoming obese. A group of European child health experts have found a strong link between obesity and prolonged exposure to media and technology during their formative years.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 24th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42050438

Different types of alcoholic drink change and shape your mood in different ways, says a study into drinking and emotions. According to researchers, spirits may make you feel angry, sexy or tearful, while red wine or beer may make you feel relaxed.  They questioned nearly thirty thousand people aged eighteen to thirty four from twenty one different countries for the study in the journal BMJ Open. All the respondents drank beer, wine and spirits, and many said each type of alcohol had a different effect on them. While having a few drinks can be enjoyable, researchers hope their findings will help highlight the dangers of dependent drinking.
People build up tolerance to alcohol over time and can end up drinking more to feel the same “positive” effects that they enjoy.

But they also risk getting negative ones too, says researcher Professor Mark Bellis from Public Health Wales NHS Trust. The anonymous online survey, which recruited respondents via newspaper and magazine adverts and social media found: Red wine appeared to make people more lethargic than white wine;  Respondents were most likely to report feeling relaxed when drinking red wine or beer; More than forty percent said drinking spirits made them feel sexy;  Over half said drinking spirits also gave them energy and confidence; But around a third said they felt aggressive when drinking spirits; Drinking spirits was more likely than all other drink types to be associated with feelings of aggression, illness, restlessness and tearfulness;
Men were significantly more likely than women to associate feelings of aggression with all types of alcohol, particularly heavier drinkers
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Experts say setting a minimum unit price of fifty pence per unit would help cut alcohol-related deaths. A minimum price policy will come into force on May one, two thousand eighteen in Scotland. Legislation to establish a minimum price is currently under active consideration by the Welsh Government and by the Irish Senate. There are no plans yet to do the same in England, although the Home Office says the policy is under review.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/scientists-to-test-if-talking-therapy-can-speed-up-cancer-survivors-recovery-a3698081.html

A major study is to look at whether talking therapy can help cancer survivors cope with fears of a relapse and speed up their recovery following treatment for the disease. Researchers at Queen Mary University of London will examine whether offering help with emotional issues, concerns about work or fears of relapse can improve long-term outcomes. Professor Steph Taylor, from QMUL, said: “About a third of UK cancer survivors report poor quality of life or well-being.
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The two point five million pounds Survivors’ Rehabilitation Evaluation After Cancer project will assess the effectiveness of a talking therapy known as “acceptance and commitment” therapy.

This helps patients to accept things they cannot change, such as cancer recurrence, and sets them personal recovery goals. Adrienne Morgan, sixty one, a scientist and cancer patient advising on the project, said: “Had we been given this counselling earlier, after my initial treatment, it would have helped enormously in adapting to that new normal. I may have even been able to continue working in the job that I loved.” The study, involving three hundred forty four patients, is being funded by the National Institute for Health Research.  

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/22/children-should-have-time-smartphones-tv-limited-90-minutes/

Researchers believe that children’s time spent staring at the television, smartphones and tablets should be limited to ninety minutes a day to stop them from becoming obese. A group of European child health experts have found a strong link between obesity and prolonged exposure to media and technology during their formative years. In a wide-ranging study, they found that ninety seven percent of European households have at least one television, seventy two percent possess a computer, and ninety one percent have access to mobile phones.

As a result, today’s toddlers spend an hour a day watching television, rising “dramatically” to  seven point twenty five hours by the time they reach nine, as they become more engrossed in “other types of media.” According to the study, published in the journal Acta Paediatrica, these trends have contributed to childhood obesity levels surging at an “alarming rate” over the last twenty five years. It is now thought that nineteen percent of European children and adolescents are overweight. To address the problem, the researchers claim that parents needed to develop a greater understanding of the impact that social media and dietary habits have on their children’s long-term health.
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The study also found that late night television and social media usage disturbs young people’s sleeping patterns, which in turn can contribute to obesity. The group recommends that parents should linmit television viewing, computers and other electrical devices to one point five hours a day if a child is over four. They add that TVs should not be placed in children’s bedrooms and it should be turned off during meals and study time. Parents are also encouraged to turn off the TV during ad breaks and are asked not give children younger than twelve a smartphone. In order to lead by example, they should themselves look to reduce their own media consumption and refrain from using television and other devices as a form of “babysitting or calming” technique.

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