The Health News – 11 January 2016

Overview:
• Health authorities in Indonesia have closed down a popular chiropractic chain after the death of a young Jakarta woman Allya Siska Nadya and the disappearance overseas of the American practitioner Randall Cafferty, who treated her.

• Health workers have celebrated a key step towards eradicating the flesh-burrowing guinea worm after South Sudan — once by far the worst-affected country — recorded a massive drop in infections.

• South Australia’s Health Minister Jack Snelling has complained to his federal counterpart about short-term funding deals for adult dental services, which he says are compromising patient care.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 11th January 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-09/indonesian-authorities-close-down-chiropractic-chain-after-death/7078372

Health authorities in Indonesia have closed down a popular chiropractic chain after the death of a young patient and the disappearance overseas of the American practitioner who treated her.

The case is captivating Jakarta, where alternative medicine is big business.

The Chiropractic First chain appears respectable enough — its branches operate not from back alleys, but from the expensive real estate of Jakarta’s gleaming shopping malls.

Young Jakarta woman Allya Siska Nadya went to a Chiropractic First branch in the city’s southern suburbs …[to]  help with neck and back pain.

She was treated by an American practitioner, Randall Cafferty.

Within hours, her pain was much worse and her parents took her to hospital. By 6:00am the following day, she was dead.

This case has shaken Indonesia’s usually steadfast faith in alternative medicine.

Herbal concoctions, massage and manipulation are seen as perfectly legitimate ways to treat common ailments.

There has been growing public disquiet over the death of Ms Nadya, an apparently healthy young woman.

There is another problem — Dr Cafferty has left the country.

That is fortunate for him, because Indonesia’s health officials have found all kinds of problems with his business.

According to Kusmedi, the head of Jakarta’s Health Office, Dr Cafferty breached the country’s strict labour laws.

Police also discovered Dr Cafferty came to Indonesia after problems in the US.

Health officials have ordered [to] closed all of the city’s Chiropractic First branches.

Police said they would keep trying to track down the missing manipulator.

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-09/flesh-burrowing-guinea-worm-almost-eradicated/7077728

Health workers have celebrated a key step towards eradicating the flesh-burrowing guinea worm after South Sudan — once by far the worst-affected country — recorded a massive drop in infections.

“South Sudan is on the verge of eliminating guinea worm disease,” South Sudan Health Minister Riek Gai Kok said in a statement, after workers recorded just five cases last year, a more than 90 per cent drop from 2014, when 70 cases were recorded — the highest number globally.

Guinea worm is a debilitating parasite that digs out the body — including even eyes and sexual organs — but is close to being stamped out for good following a two-decade campaign by The Carter Centre, a not-for-profit organisation founded by former US president Jimmy Carter.

Last year there were 22 cases in just four nations across Africa, compared to 3.5 million in 20 countries in 1986 when The Carter Centre began its massive push … to stop the water-borne parasite.

If the campaign succeeds, guinea worm will become the first parasitic disease to be eradicated and only the second human disease to [be] wiped out worldwide after smallpox in 1979.

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-08/snelling-pleads-for-long-term-dental-funding-for-sa/7075244

South Australia’s Health Minister Jack Snelling has complained to his federal counterpart about short-term funding deals for adult dental services, which he says are compromising patient care.

More than $12 million in Commonwealth money will fund the treatment of an additional 14,617 patients on the public waiting list over the next six months.

But Mr Snelling says Federal Health Minister Sussan Ley had offered a 12-month agreement earlier last year but took to December to sign off on the funding.

Due to the delay, there is only six months left to spend the money.

Mr Snelling said some people could be on the dental waiting list for up to 12 months.

“If you’re waiting for important dental treatment it can be completely debilitating,” he said.

“People can be in enormous amounts of pain while their [sic] waiting for this very important treatment.”

Mr Snelling wrote to Ms Ley to urge the Federal Government to bring in long-term funding agreements for dental services.

In the letter, he said the current deal would create problems for service delivery.

A spokesman for Ms Ley said the Government was working on broader funding reforms.

Previously, Ms Ley said the Government wanted to deliver greater coordination and less duplication of dental services and was planning to release further details in the 2015-16 financial year.