The Health News – 11 March 2016

Overview:
• The number of elective surgeries postponed at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Adelaide’s north-west continues to climb due to an ongoing problem with air-conditioning. Technicians were working to fix the problem and it is hoped surgeries can resume next week.

• The clinical study MAP US is testing a novel approach for the treatment of Crohn’s disease by targeting the bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), a potential cause of Crohn’s disease. This study will randomize 270 participants and take place in approximately 120 doctors’ offices in the US, and in Canada, Israel, Australia, New Zealand and Poland.

• Health groups are hoping a new documentary will help raise awareness about the high risk of Rheumatic Heart Disease facing Australasian Indigenous children. The documentary ake Heart looks at the social and environmental factors leaving Indigenous Australians at higher risk, and premiered in Melbourne ahead of next Thursday’s national Close the Gap Day.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 11th of March 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-10/more-elective-surgeries-postponed-at-queen-elizabeth/7236558

The number of elective surgeries postponed at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Adelaide’s north-west continues to climb due to an ongoing problem with air-conditioning.

A total of 90 procedures had been postponed by Wednesday afternoon but that number has since grown to 110.

Urgent category one elective surgeries have been transferred to the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH).

Central Adelaide Local Health Network chief operating officer Todd McEwan confirmed a technical fault had occurred in some operating theatres.

“Air-conditioning in the emergency operating theatre is functioning and all emergency surgeries are going ahead,” he said.

The issue followed a similar air-conditioning fault that happened about two weeks ago.

It resulted in 100 non-urgent elective surgeries being postponed and emergency surgery cases being transferred to the RAH.

Technicians were working to fix the problem and it is hoped surgeries can resume next week.

http://www.newsmaker.com.au/news/40261/crohns-disease-research-study-in-australia#.VuFcqYx97LZ

For Immediate Release

Adelaide, Ballarat, Bedford Park, Box Hill, Clayton, Concord, Kingswood, Liverpool, Malvern, Newcastle – Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. 

The inflammation caused by Crohn’s disease often spreads beyond affected areas. 

Crohn’s disease can be both painful and debilitating, and sometimes may lead to life-threatening complications. 

This clinical study is testing a novel approach for the treatment of Crohn’s disease by targeting the bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), a potential cause of Crohn’s disease. This study is called MAP US.

This study will randomize 270 participants and take place in approximately 120 doctors’ offices in the US, and in Canada, Israel, Australia, New Zealand and Poland.  

Potential candidates will be men and women 18 to 75 years of age with moderately to severly active Crohn’s disease diagnosed more than six months ago.  

The study will involve participation of up to 62 weeks. 

Compensation is  available. 

More information for this study can be found by visiting www.MAPmyCrohns.com.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-10/rheumatic-heart-disease-tackled-in-new-documentary/7237726

Health groups are hoping a new documentary will help raise awareness about the high risk of Rheumatic Heart Disease facing Australasian Indigenous children.

Rheumatic Heart Disease starts as a simple sore throat and kills more than 1,000 people globally, every day.

It occurs when the little valves in the heart get damaged.

“The doors don’t open and close normally and it allows the blood to go backwards rather than forwards,” Darwin-based paediatric cardiologist Dr Bo Remenyi said.

“That eventually leads to heart failure, being short of breath, swelling of the arms and legs and not being able to walk around or play around.”

The disease used to be very common in Melbourne, Sydney and Adelaide, but rates have declined dramatically over the past 50 years.

But it remains a major problem in the top end of Australia, especially in Indigenous populations.

“The Northern Territory has the world’s highest rates — approximately 2 to 3 per cent of all children and young adults have Rheumatic Heart Disease,” Dr Remenyi said.

Eighteen-year-old Liddywoo Mardi from the Northern Territory caught Rheumatic Heart Fever while playing in muddy water.

It progressed to heart disease, and before his most recent of three open heart surgeries, he would cough relentlessly and wheeze with each breath.

The surgery was a success, but simple activities are still a stretch.

But he is one of the lucky ones.

Doctors have removed his aorta valve and replaced it with a mechanical valve, which Mr Mardi calls his “grasshopper”.

He also takes daily blood thinning medication to ward off a stroke or heart attack and has weekly blood tests.

Over the past two years he has grown up on film, hoping that a new documentary called Take Heart, will warn other children not to make the same mistakes.

“To show every little kid not to play in the rain and mud otherwise they might end up like this, sick,” he said.

Take Heart looks at the social and environmental factors leaving Indigenous Australians at higher risk, and premiered in Melbourne [last night] ahead of next Thursday’s national Close the Gap Day.

Director of the documentary, Mike Hill, said he took on the project to help raise awareness about the disease.