The Health News – 14 January 2016

Overview:
• A man who allegedly shot a police officer and a security guard outside a Sydney hospital, following a scuffle in which he grabbed the officer’s gun, has been charged with shooting with intent to murder.

•  There is no evidence treatments at Australia’s first dedicated hangover clinic work, the Australian Medical Association has said, raising concerns that the business could encourage people to binge drink. The Sydney-based facility offers IV fluids, pain relief, vitamins and oxygen to patients who are feeling the ill effects of too much alcohol.

• Canberra has been spared the forecasted “Godzilla” hayfever season thanks to a well-timed burst of wet weather, however certain people are more likely than others to suffer. The project’s head Simon Haberle said certain occupations were more likely to experience hayfever symptoms.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th January 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-13/nepean-hospital-shooting-man-charged-after-police-officer-shot/7085760

A man who allegedly shot a police officer and a security guard outside a Sydney hospital, following a scuffle in which he grabbed the officer’s gun, has been charged with shooting with intent to murder.

NSW Police said officers were called to Nepean Hospital just before 10:30pm on Tuesday after Senior Constable Luke Warburton was shot.

Police allege the 39-year-old man had earlier been threatening a doctor with scissors.

He is also facing a charge of discharge[ing] a firearm with intent to resist arrest and a charge of detain for advantage.

He has been refused bail and is due to appear at Penrith Local Court …

The New South Wales Health Services Union said the shooting highlighted an increase in violence in emergency departments.

Union secretary Gerard Hayes said hospital security staff needed to be given the power to restrain and detain people who threaten staff.

NSW Health Minister Jillian Skinner said she had agreed to meet with the Health Services Union next week to discuss their concerns regarding security in hospitals.

Health authorities have opened a drop-in counselling clinic for affected patients and staff.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-13/sydney-hangover-clinic-could-encourage-binge-drinking-ama-fears/7085102

There is no evidence treatments at Australia’s first dedicated hangover clinic work, the Australian Medical Association has said, raising concerns that the business could encourage people to binge drink.

The Sydney-based facility offers IV fluids, pain relief, vitamins and oxygen to patients who are feeling the ill effects of too much alcohol.

The co-owner of the clinic, former lawyer Max Petro, said he had been working under the watchful eye of New South Wales health officials and so far had heard no objections from them.

But AMA vice-president Stephen Parnis said the treatment offered by the clinic was not based in evidence.

“At worst it can cause harm to people, with unnecessary insertion of intravenous cannula,” Dr Parnis said.

“It may get some people to consider that they can write themselves off and that somehow these people will come to the rescue.”

Mr Petro said he did not believe his service would encourage binge drinking, especially given the cost of treatments start at $95 for the “Hydro” package, which involves one litre of IV hydration.

At the top end of the packages available at the clinic is the “Resurrection” deal, which costs $200.

Mr Petro said that services like his could also have other benefits for the greater health system.

These types of clinics are already popular overseas, with “hangover buses” patrolling neighbourhoods in cities such as New York and hotels offering IV recovery drip room service in Las Vegas.

But this is the first of its kind in Australia.

Mr Petro said the business had been so successful that he was already considering expanding.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-13/no-godzilla-hayfever-season-however-some-still-suffer/7085114

Canberra has been spared the forecast[ed] “Godzilla” hayfever season thanks to a well-timed burst of wet weather, however certain people are more likely than others to suffer.

The 2015 Canberra Pollen Count, a joint initiative by the ANU and ACT Health, found real estate agents, hospitality workers and young people were still more likely to experience hayfever symptoms.

The project’s head Simon Haberle said certain occupations were more likely to experience hayfever symptoms.

In October, Professor Haberle said Spring of 2015 would bring an extreme hayfever season.

While the early part of the season did see high levels of pollen in the atmosphere, wet weather just before the traditional peak of the season in late November helped to dampen pollen down.

Pollen levels in the atmosphere were classified as high or severe on just nine days in 2015, compared with 30 days in 2014.

The findings showed that older Canberrans were more likely to use hayfever medication than those aged 18 to 25, which was reflected in a higher level of hayfever symptoms being reported by young people.

 

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