The Health News – 14 September 2015


Overview:
• The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, found that capturing the cells prevents their spread and helps stop cancer progression.The study’s co-author, Professor Lonnie Shea from the University of Michigan, said the invention could lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating cancer.

•  A new Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) report shows cavities in country children are 55 per cent higher than city children and almost 40 per cent of adults in the bush suffer the chronic disease of untreated tooth decay, compared to less than a quarter in the city.The rate is worse for Indigenous Australians, with 57 per cent also suffering tooth decay. RFDS CEO Martin Laverty said there was a lack of dentists in regional and remote areas.

• Vietnam veteran Augustinus Krikke, 64, has camped on the steps of South Australia’s Parliament House for 161 days, fighting to save the Daw Park Repatriation Hospital. But yesterday he gave up his post. “We’re not going to achieve any more than what we have done here on the steps, so it’s time to leave,” he said.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th September 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-11/scientists-create-tiny-implant-that-attracts-cancer-cells/6769546

Scientists in the US have created a tiny implant which attracts and captures cancer cells spreading through the body.

The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, found that capturing the cells prevents their spread and helps stop cancer progression.

The study’s co-author, Professor Lonnie Shea from the University of Michigan, said the invention could lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating cancer.

“We started with an idea of, could we develop an implant that the cancer cells would go to, and the idea is that the cancer cells are going to the lung, could we make something that could be more attracted to the cancer cells more than the lungs and that way the cells would go there,” she said.

“And you’d also know where to look, you’d have a place that you could specifically scan… and you’d know, ‘Okay there’s no signs of cancerous cells, I’m cancer free’ [she said]

“Or if you find something suspicions then you could take it out, you could then analyse it, figure out what’s the best chemotherapy drug for you and then be able to start therapy.”

The implant is made of polylactide-co-glycolide, … a material that dissolves after a period of time.

“The long-term vision for this is that patients with a high risks for developing cancer could actually get an implant and that implant could essentially be scanned very regularly to look for the earliest signs that cancer is occurring,” Professor Shea said.

“That way you could actually know very early stages when the cancer’s starting, you could then take action immediately.

“At the same time there is this benefit that having the implant actually seems to reduce the extent to which the cancerous cells are present, so it has certainly this early intervention approach to it but also has seems to have some therapeutic opportunities because it does reduce the number of cancer cells.”

Professor Shea said the researchers are hoping to begin human trials in the next six to nine months.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-13/remote-dental-health-worse-than-developing-countries/6771138

The level of tooth decay in people living in some remote areas of Australia is worse than that of their city peers, the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) says.

A new RFDS report shows cavities in country children are 55 per cent higher than city children and almost 40 per cent of adults in the bush suffer the chronic disease of untreated tooth decay, compared to less than a quarter in the city.

The rate is worse for Indigenous Australians, with 57 per cent also suffering tooth decay.

RFDS CEO Martin Laverty said there was a lack of dentists in regional and remote areas.

“There are three times more dentists in the city than there are in the bush, and it’s because country kids are not able to get access to dental services that we are seeing high tooth decay in country areas,” he said.

Tooth extractions, missing teeth and gum disease in both children and adults were also found to be far higher in country areas.

Mr Laverty said the findings reflected wider health concerns for those living remotely.


Mr Laverty said it was not reasonable to expect dentists in every country town, so has instead called for a nation-wide rollout of its flying dentist program as the primary solution.

The program has already been introduced in parts of South Australia, NSW and Queensland, but the RFDS said it needed federal money to ensure every corner of Australia was covered by fly-in or drive-in dentists.

But other parts of the dental industry said the money could be spent elsewhere.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-13/save-the-repat-protest-at-parliament-ends/6771788

Vietnam veteran Augustinus Krikke, 64, has camped on the steps of South Australia’s Parliament House for 161 days, fighting to save the Daw Park Repatriation Hospital.

But …[yesterday] he gave up his post.

“We’re not going to achieve any more than what we have done here on the steps, so it’s time to leave,” he said.

Mr Krikke is one of several veterans who slept outside Parliament since the State Government announced it would close the hospital, which has served the veteran community for decades.

Its services will be moved elsewhere under the Government’s Transforming Health Plan, when the hospital closes in 2017.

A petition has been tabled in Parliament with 85,000 signatures against the closure, most of which were collected by the veterans.

It has now been signed by about 120,000 people.

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