The Health News – 15 September 2015

Overview:
• A study was published in the Medical Journal of Australia examined that the cause of Type-2 Diabetes and why it is worse in certain parts of Australia. And they have found that out that they have a fewer healthy food options for the people who live there. Director of Public Health Sciences at Western Sydney University Dr. Thomas Astell-Burt and Dr. Xiaoqi Feng from the University of Wollongong calculated the number of greengrocers, supermarkets, takeaway shops and alcohol outlets that are 20 minutes’ walk away from a person’s home.

• A new study into health risks linked to Mr Fluffy loose-fill asbestos-contaminated houses has found a rising incidence of mesothelioma in Canberra over the past 30 years. But the Australian National University research found in the period from 1982 to 2011, only one case of mesothelioma had been diagnosed in a person while living in a Mr Fluffy house.
The final results of the study will be released in 2017.

• Perpetrators of family violence will be given better access to programs aimed at changing their behaviour and cycle of abuse, the Victorian Government says. Corrections Minister Wade Noonan said it was an important step in trying to break the cycle of family violence for men, many of whom who may have experienced it themselves as children. He said he hoped the plan would be in place by the end of next month.


News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th September 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-14/lack-of-fresh-food-options-means-higher-rates-of-diabetes-study/6772662

Areas with higher rates of Type-2 Diabetes also have fewer healthy food options for the people who live there, scientists have found.

The study, published ….[yeatsreday] in the Medical Journal of Australia, examined the causes of Type-2 Diabetes and why it is worse in certain parts of the Australia.

Director of Public Health Sciences at Western Sydney University Dr Thomas Astell-Burt and Dr Xiaoqi Feng from the University of Wollongong calculated the number of greengrocers, supermarkets, takeaway shops and alcohol outlets 20 minutes’ walk from a person’s home, comparing selected areas of Sydney’s west and the north shore.

In the west, about 28 per cent of neighbourhoods had at least a three to one ratio of takeaway shops to greengrocers and supermarkets as well as a much higher rate of Type-2 Diabetes.

The figure was 20 per cent in the North Shore.

“Our previous research and others have already shown that prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is higher in many suburbs in western Sydney,” Dr Astell-Burt said.

“If you’re living in some areas of Western Sydney you’re more likely to be surrounded by takeaway shops rather than places where you can buy healthier foods.

“For instance, take the suburbs of Blacktown and Mount Druitt the prevalence is above 5 per cent, getting on to 6 to 7 per cent.

“If you compare those suburbs with places such as Mosman or areas …around north Sydney prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is more like 2 or 2.5 per cent.”

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-14/rise-in-mesothelioma-cases-since-mr-fluffy-installation-study/6772580

A new study into health risks linked to Mr Fluffy loose-fill asbestos-contaminated houses has found a rising incidence of mesothelioma in Canberra over the past 30 years.

But the Australian National University research found in the period from 1982 to 2011, only one case of mesothelioma had been diagnosed in a person while living in a Mr Fluffy house.

The potentially deadly asbestos fibres have led to a buyback and demolition scheme for more than 1,000 affected houses in Canberra.

The study found the rate of mesothelioma cases in the ACT between 1994 and 2011 rose at a slightly greater rate than the rest of Australia.

However the study’s co-lead investigator Rosmary Korda said finding trends from the data carried statistical uncertainty because of the small case numbers involved.

“Mesothelioma is a relatively rare cancer so we know there has only been about 140 cases in the last 30 years,” she said.

“There has been an increase in rates, but we don’t know if it is connected with Mr Fluffy.

“This study is a descriptive study, we look at all the cases over time that have been registered in the ACT, but it just describes the trends and we compare them to other jurisdictions.”

This rise in rates means the ACT now has a similar diagnosis rate to the rest of Australia.

Inhalation of asbestos fibres is the predominant cause of mesothelioma and an important contributor to risk of lung cancer in exposed people.

… The symptoms can take 20 to 50 years to appear after the initial exposure.

The study also found that men were more likely to be diagnosed … with four out of every five cases diagnosed in men.

Also, a large portion of the cases were diagnosed in people aged 65 and older, with less than 5 percent diagnosed in people aged under 45.

Health minister Simon Corbell said the study is the first of four reports into the health risks of living in a house with loose-fill asbestos.

The final results of the study will be released in 2017.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-14/family-violence-offenders-to-attend-mens-behaviour-programs/6773068

Perpetrators of family violence will be given better access to programs aimed at changing their behaviour and cycle of abuse, the Victorian Government says.

Places in men’s behaviour change programs will be offered to offenders serving prison sentences and community corrections orders, and also those on remand.

Corrections Minister Wade Noonan said it was an important step in trying to break the cycle of family violence for men, many of whom who may have experienced it themselves as children.

“For many offenders, they have never done a program at all, so this may be a first and important step in terms of breaking a cycle, or at least understanding the damage that can be done in terms of the damage to themselves and damage to those around them,” Mr Noonan said.

“Those I’ve spoken to in the family violence area indicate that this is a very positive step forward.

“[The initiative] will reach about 1,100 offenders a year, both in the community and in prison, and as it’s our number one law and order issue in the state, that’s a very important investment.”

He said the Government had allocated an additional $2 million on top of money already outlined in the budget to fund the move.

He said he hoped the plan would be in place by the end of next month.

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