The Health News – 16 December 2015

Overview:
• The board of the Far West Local Health District will put itself under the spotlight early next year, conducting an audit of its governance. The LHD has been dogged by workplace bullying allegations this year, launching two internal reviews, saying neither substantiated the claims against senior staff by hospital workers.

• US dating app Tinder is teaming up with Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) to raise awareness among the young about organ donation. Romance-seekers swiping on some profiles will be prompted to sign up to the NHS organ donor register.

• The trial has shown that the drug anastrozole is as effective as tamoxifen for treating postmenopausal women with an early form of breast cancer, known as ductal carcinoma. The study was co-ordinated by the Australia and New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group, and the results have been presented to the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 16th December 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-15/local-health-authorities-pleased-with-2015-performance-as-board/7028668

The board of the Far West Local Health District will put itself under the spotlight early next year, conducting an audit of its governance.

The LHD has been dogged by workplace bullying allegations this year, launching two internal reviews, saying neither substantiated the claims against senior staff by hospital workers.

But chief executive Stuart Riley also told this week’s annual public meeting it had been a good year, with an improvement in the stability of staffing, and that the LHD is one of only five to be put in the top performance band by the health department.

Chairman Tom Hynes said the board’s decided to initiate a governance audit next year, and will respond to any issues that are raised.

“I haven’t got any anticipation [of the outcome] at all,” Mr Hynes said.

“I hope it comes out to be a fairly good and sound audit, but like all these things they always find something that is not necessarily exactly correct and we will address what outcomes come our way.”

Mr Hynes praised staff for their professionalism in the face of ongoing media coverage.

He says he’s particularly pleased with the revenue raised at the hospital itself, and commended a major donation earlier this year by the volunteer-run hospital kiosk.

“They turn over somewhere between $400,000 and half a million dollars, out of that they make a donation to us of $188,000,” Mr Hynes said.

“That’s just absolutely phenomenal, and that goes towards buying equipment that assists in our operation, assists in better surgery for our patients.”

He cited the filming of the ABC’s television series Outback ER at Broken Hill’s hospital as another high point of the year, and said the YourSay Survey showed most staff say they would recommend their workplace as a good place to work.

The LHD says it recorded a $586,000 deficit, which jumps to a $5.3 million surplus taking into account a revaluation of the organisation’s property, plant and equipment.

Revenue was $103.9 million, an increase of $4.6 million on the previous year, while total expenditure was $104.5 million, up on last year’s $100.9 million.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-14/uk-tinder-users-urged-to-donate-organs/7028036 

US dating app Tinder is teaming up with Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) to raise awareness among the young about organ donation.

Romance-seekers swiping on some profiles will be prompted to sign up to the NHS organ donor register.

After swiping, users will receive a message reading: “If only it was that easy for those in need of a life-saving organ to find a match”.

As part of the campaign, artificial profiles have also been created for Olympic medallist Jade Jones and soap stars Jamie Laing and Gemma Oaten.

“With the help of these bespoke profiles on Tinder, we’ll grab people’s attention and throw a spotlight on the importance of organ donation,” said Sally Johnson, NHS director of Organ Donation and Transplantation.

“Joining the register takes only a couple of minutes — about the same amount of time as a few swipes on Tinder.”

Around 7,000 people are currently on the transplant waiting list in Britain.

“Tinder users regularly make the decision to swipe left or right wondering whether someone may be the person they are looking for,” added Hermion Way, Tinder’s head of European communications.

“While those swiping decisions are important and could be the first step to a successful relationship, we hope that the NHS profiles … will encourage people to make and act upon a different decision too — to sign up as an organ donor.”

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-12/newcastle-researchers-seeing-good-results-in-cancer-trial/7022978

There is new hope for Hunter cancer sufferers, with Newcastle researchers involved in a successful global clinical trial.

The trial has shown that the drug anastrozole is as effective as tamoxifen for treating postmenopausal women with an early form of breast cancer, known as ductal carcinoma.

The study was co-ordinated by the Australia and New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group, and the results have been presented to the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

Study chair Newcastle Professor John Forbes said the results are encouraging.

“We find that there was a modest but seemingly real reduction in the risk of getting another breast cancer, or the recurrence of the DCIS for women taking the anastrazol compared with the tamoxifen,” he said.

“At the [very] same time a large American group has done a very similar trial with very similar results.

Professor Forbes said the drug has led to an 11 per cent drop in ductal carcinoma reoccurring.

“It’s not a total game changer, in that we have cured all breast cancer – it is nothing like that,” he said.

“But there are thousands of women who can benefit from this.

“We are spending a lot of effort today in trying to characterise each individual cancer, so that we can give the best treatment for each cancer.”

 

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