The Health News – 19 February 2016

Overview:
• Child vaccination rates in parts of South Australian have improved more than anywhere else in the country, a new report suggests, but rates vary across the state and SA Health is not sure why.

• PlusLife, Western Australia’s only bone bank says it will be forced to close its doors within months if it cannot secure $10 million to relocate, it provides bone and tissue transplants to patients with bone cancer and arthritic diseases.

• In west Java, south-east of Jakarta, Indonesia poverty can be seen everywhere. In one local village, 70 per cent of people have no employment and spend their days scavenging through rubbish.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 19th February 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-18/reasons-for-vaccination-rates-difference-unclear-sa-health/7179180

Child vaccination rates in parts of South Australian have improved more than anywhere else in the country, a new report suggests, but rates vary across the state and SA Health is not sure why.

The National Health Performance Authority report found vaccination rates of one-year-old children ranged from 94 per cent to 88 per cent in 31 Primary Health Networks across the nation, and that more than 84,500 children aged one, two and five were not fully immunised in 2014-15.

The report found the most significant increase in vaccination rates in one year olds was in the South Australia’s Outback North and East region with rate increasing from 85 per cent to 93 per cent.

Tasmania’s Kingston and Kingston Beach had the highest rates for one year olds, with 98.2 per cent, followed by Adelaide’s Fairview Park, Surrey Downs and Yatala Vale, with 98.1 per cent.

Meanwhile, Adelaide’s beach suburb of Glenelg had a rate of 82.1 per cent, which rounded out the top 10 lowest suburbs list in the nation.

Across SA, 91 per cent of one year olds, 87.8 per cent of two year olds and 90.5 per cent of five year olds were fully vaccinated.

Health chiefs across the nation agreed in 2014 to a 95 per cent target for all children to be fully immunised to protect against illnesses including measles and whooping cough.

SA Health’s chief medical officer Paddy Phillips said the reason for the difference in rates was unclear.

He said health authorities had been offering community education and a variety of settings for vaccinations to take place in a bid to reach its target.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-18/wa-bone-bank-faces-uncertain-future/7178860

Western Australia’s only bone bank says it will be forced to close its doors within months if it cannot secure $10 million to relocate.

PlusLife provides bone and tissue transplants to patients with bone cancer and arthritic diseases.

The not-for-profit organisation also provides replacement tissue for treatment of young children with spinal deformities.

It began operating in the early 1990s and has been located in the grounds of Hollywood Hospital in Nedlands for 12 years.

But with redevelopments at that campus set to begin in 2017, PlusLife has less than two years to secure a new facility.

The organisation’s managing director Anne Cowie said time was running out.

The group believes it has found a suitable home after negotiating with the Metropolitan Redevelopment Authority to lease the heritage listed Midland Railway Institute and Technical Building.

But it is waiting for confirmation of a $10 million package from the State Government to help pay for the move

Premier Colin Barnett pledged the situation would be resolved to ensure the facility would be able to keep operating.

“It will cost the Government a lot of money to do so but we recognise the importance of that service,” Mr Barnett …[said].

“It will continue and it will be properly accommodated.”

PlusLife is one of a handful of bone tissue transplant organisations in Australia, and the only one not to receive any form of state or federal funding.

But Ms Cowie said the organisation was not looking for a handout.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-18/organ-trafficking-trade-operating-in-indonesian-villages/7178882

In … west Java, poverty can be seen everywhere.

In one local village, 70 per cent of people have no employment and spend their days scavenging through rubbish.

It is here, about 200 kilometres south-east of Jakarta, the ABC found evidence of an organ trafficking trade where residents have sold their kidneys.

The lure of 75 million Rupiah, or around $7,500, was too much for eight residents of the local village.

Two of the victims there, including 18-year-old Ifan, has a wife and a young child.

In the small, dark and damp room they call home, there are very few possessions and there is not a toy in sight.

“I was in need of money to pay off my debt,” Ifan said.

“I wanted to get a big amount of money. How could I do that so I could pay off my debt and provide for my family?”

Ifan said a broker named Amang came to the village to organise the deal, convincing him it was medically safe and his health would not suffer.

The medical check-ups and surgery took place at …. [a] hospital in central Jakarta.