The Health News – 2 February 2016

Overview:
• The handover of the new Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) to the South Australian Government is expected to be delayed by up to two months, independent advisers have told the Government. Health Minister Jack Snelling said any delay would not affect the site’s scheduled opening date in November.

• The father of Phelicity Sneesby, 13 years old with congenital heart defect from New South Wales says he is overwhelmed at the outpouring of support to help fly his daughter back to Australia.

• Abul Bajandar a Bangladeshi father dubbed “Tree Man” for massive bark-like warts on his hands and feet will finally have surgery to remove the growths that first began appearing 10 years ago, according to Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH).

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 2nd February 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-01/construction-delays-at-new-rah-won’t-impact-opening-snelling/7129496

The handover of the new Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) to the South Australian Government is expected to be delayed by up to two months, independent advisers have told the Government.

Health Minister Jack Snelling said any delay … would not affect the site’s scheduled opening date in November.

The hospital is scheduled to be completed in July after the Government last year revised the original April deadline.

Mr Snelling said while the builder was adamant they would finish on time, the Government had received independent advice that the handover would be delayed.

He said he did not expect any additional costs associated with the latest delay to be passed on to taxpayers.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-01/campaign-raises-money-for-sick-ballina-girl-to-fly-home/7128850

The father of a seriously ill New South Wales teenager says he is overwhelmed at the outpouring of support to help fly his daughter back to Australia.

Phelicity Sneesby, 13, from Ballina on the NSW north coast, has a congenital heart defect and has been in intensive care in the US state of Ohio for two months after an operation proved unsuccessful.

Family friend Megan Latham launched an online campaign last Tuesday to help raise money for a special medical flight home.

It has now raised more than $200,000.

Phelicity’s father, Ben Sneesby, said his family had never been happier.

“It’s been incredible,” he said.

“It’s so hard to believe that people who have never met us are able to show how much love they have.

“Phelicity has always had great faith …and we’ve prayed so many times that we’re able to get her home.

“It really feels like all of our prayers are being answered.”

Mr Sneesby said his daughter had a ticket for a commercial flight home but she was unable to use it after complications in Ohio, where she has travelled for 28 surgeries throughout her life.

In order for Phelicity to travel she has to be with a medical team in a specialised hospital bed, which comes at a cost.

Mr Sneesby said his daughter simply wanted to come home.

“She’s extremely excited,” he said.

“Now that she knows there’s a possibility it’s going to happen soon, it’s making her feel so much better.

“It’s allowing her to mentally have a bit of comfort, knowing that she’ll be able to come home and see her sisters, see her house and [see] her friends.”

He is hoping she will be home by International Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Day on February 14.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-01/surgery-for-bangladesh’s-‘tree-man’-to-remove-warts/7128802

A Bangladeshi father dubbed “Tree Man” for massive bark-like warts on his hands and feet will finally have surgery to remove the growths that first began appearing 10 years ago, a hospital says.

Abul Bajandar, from the southern district of Khulna, is undergoing preparations for the surgery to cut out the growths weighing at least 5 kilograms that have smothered his hands and feet.

“Initially, I thought that they’re harmless,” the 26-year-old said at the Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH).

“But slowly I lost all my ability to work. There are now dozens of two- to three-inch roots in both my hands. And there are some small ones in my legs,” said Mr Bajandar, who was forced to quit working as a bicycle puller.

A team of doctors has been formed to perform the operation at … Bangladesh’s largest state-run hospital, which has decided to waive costs of the treatment.

Tests are underway to ensure Mr Bajandar’s root-like warts can be removed surgically without damaging major nerves or causing any other health problems.