The Health News – 20 April 2016

Overview:
• Women are more likely to be affected by jobs involving night shift work than men, according to a study that was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science journal.

• Patients at one of Australia’s most popular cosmetic surgery clinics, The Cosmetic Institute (TCI) are being knocked out without their consent, they were given dangerously high doses of drugs that can cause cardiac arrests.

• New research from the University of Melbourne has found working part-time for about 25 to 30 hours a week had a positive impact on the cognitive function for Australians aged over 40. But for those working more than three days a week, research found stress and fatigue could erase those positive impacts.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  20th of April 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-19/women-may-be-more-affected-by-shift-work-than-men/7335368

Women are more likely to be affected by jobs involving night shiftwork than men, according to a new study.

The study shows women’s ability to perform tasks accurately is reduced when working night shifts into the early morning — particularly common in medical professions.

The finding comes from a paper published … in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science journal that details for the first time how changes in sleep-wake cycles and circadian rhythm differently influence brain function in men and women.

To track these differences, lead author Professor Derk-Jan Dijk, from the University of Surrey, and colleagues from the UK and Singapore rescheduled the sleep-wake cycles of 16 men and 18 women to a 28-hour day, which involved going to bed and waking four hours later each day.

For the 10-day experiment, all time cues and external light were removed from the laboratory and low-light conditions maintained during “waking hours”.

Dr Dijk said the creation of a 28-hour day disrupted the sleep-wake cycle and made it easier to determine the impact of the body — or brain — clock on performance.

Participants undertook a series of cognitive tasks and self-assessments every three hours while they were awake.

The activities included rankings of sleepiness, mood and effort required to complete tasks and tests to measure attention, accuracy and motor control.

Dr Dijk said the study showed in women the performance on certain tasks was more impaired by “being awake at the wrong time of day” than in men.

“Extrapolation of these findings to the real world implies that women may be more affected by shiftwork than men,” he said.

The researchers also suggest this difference “may in part reflect social factors such as family and childcare responsibilities that lead women to work longer hours and to sleep less on days off than men”.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-19/breast-implant-patients-knocked-out-without-consent/7329324

Patients at one of Australia’s most popular cosmetic surgery clinics are being knocked out without their consent, an explosive leaked report has revealed.

… women getting breast implants at The Cosmetic Institute (TCI) were given dangerously high doses of drugs that can cause cardiac arrests.

According to the NSW Health Care Complaints Commission (HCCC) report, in the last 12 months six patients suffered potentially life-threatening complications while getting breast implants, including rapid heartbeat, seizures and cardiac arrest.

High doses of anaesthetics used at the clinic appear to be to blame.

“Adrenaline was used routinely (in combination with local anaesthetic agents) … at well above the accepted upper limit of safe dosage,” the report found.

It found the clinics “placed the health and safety of members of the public at risk”.

Merrilyn Walton, a professor of Medical Education, Patient Safety at the University of Sydney, said the findings were “extremely worrying”.

The Cosmetic Institute is Australia’s largest provider of cosmetic surgery.

The highly critical report found patients were being given high doses of anaesthetic cocktails, to the point where they were “under a general anaesthetic”.

But the clinics are only licensed to provide “conscious sedation”.

Patients had not given their consent to be put under a general anaesthetic.

Professor Walton said she was very concerned that patients had not given proper, informed consent.

Doses were not being adjusted for individual patients’ size and body weight.

Daniel Fleming from the Australasian College of Cosmetic Surgeons said the doctors involved needed to be held to account for their actions.

Growing complaints about cosmetic surgery have also prompted the Medical Board to conduct a widespread review of the cosmetic surgery industry in Australia.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-19/proof-that-working-less-is-actually-better-for-your-brain/7337436

Researchers have backed the popular belief that working less could be better for your brain.

New research from the University of Melbourne has found working part-time for about 25 to 30 hours a week had a positive impact on the cognitive function for Australians aged over 40.

But for those working more than three days a week, research found stress and fatigue could erase those positive impacts.

The study analysed the work habits and brain-testing results of 3,000 men and 3,500 women over the age of 40 in Australia.

Specifically, the participants’ results in three different cognitive skill areas were tested, which included a memory score test, a reading test and a perceptive ability test.

“In all three cases [tests] it was found around 25-30 hours of work per week will maximise your cognitive skill,” said Professor Colin McKenzie at Keio University who took part in the study.

“And going for less hours or more hours reduces your cognitive skills.”

Professor McKenzie said one of the key findings showed working both zero hours and at the other end of the spectrum, 50-60 hours, led to the same levels of cognitive skill.