The News – 20 Jan 2015

Overview

  • A Coalition backbencher who once worked as a GP is calling for a crackdown on “cowboy” doctors in any government push to overhaul Medicare.
  • Australian surfers are developing potentially fatal melanomas at three times the national average, new research has found.
  • The Malian government and the United Nations have declared Mali free of Ebola after 42 days without any new cases of the deadly virus.


Health News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th January 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-19/liberal-mp-wants-crackdown-on-cowboy-doctors/6024072

A Coalition backbencher who once worked as a GP is calling for a crackdown on “cowboy” doctors in any government push to overhaul Medicare.
Andrew Laming, who is still a qualified eye specialist, has also suggested financial rNews on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th January 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-19/liberal-mp-wants-crackdown-on-cowboy-doctors/6024072

A Coalition backbencher who once worked as a GP is calling for a crackdown on “cowboy” doctors in any government push to overhaul Medicare.

Andrew Laming, who is still a qualified eye specialist, has also suggested financial rewards for high-performing doctors, and taken a swipe at his Government’s recent Medicare reform efforts.

Dr Laming believes any health reform needs to reward quality medicine, giving successful doctors financial incentives through the Medicare system.

“It’s a hard world out there but we have to be looking after people with chronic disease and making sure that they’re in the hands of the best possible providers.”

Australian Medical Association (AMA) president Brian Owler said he would support measures to reward doctors doing the right things.

Health Minister Sussan Ley will this week begin consultations with key groups in the sector as she works on the Government’s third attempt to overhaul Medicare.

Dr Owler said the discussion should be centred on quality of care, not the number of minutes for a consultation.

The Pharmacy Guild is using the Government’s search for health savings to renew the push for pharmacists to be given greater responsibilities, allowing them to issue repeat prescriptions and treat minor ailments such as middle ear infections.

Dr Laming expressed disappointment with how his senior colleagues had handled the Medicare debate so far.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-19/surfing-melanoma-skin-cancer/6024842

Australian surfers are developing potentially fatal melanomas at three times the national average, new research has found.

The finding is the result of a Bond University online survey of 1,350 surfers across the country into the occurrence of skin cancer over their lifetime.

Bond University Water-Based Research Unit Associate Professor Mike Climstein says it is a startling statistic.

“The 26-year prevalence rate for melanoma in Australia was 0.6 per cent at the end of 2007,” he said.

“We actually found the [surfer] melanoma rate is 1.9 per cent, just over threefold higher, which is a significant finding.”

The study found lighter-skinned surfers are at most risk, with many reporting multiple types of skin cancers.

However, he said it did not necessarily mean Australia’s estimated 2.7 million recreational surfers were at greater risk than other regular beachgoers.

“There’s not a lot of studies that have been conducted with aquatic recreational sporting enthusiasts so we really don’t know a whole lot,” Associate Professor Climstein said.

“We know quite a bit about skin cancers but the lifetime incidence of skin cancer in, for example, lifeguards, surf lifesavers – it’s still to be investigated fully.”

Associate Professor Climstein said the results highlighted the importance of sun protection, especially around the face.

He urged surfers to cover up from the sun with rash vests, hats and sunscreen and to ask for regular skin checks from their GP.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-19/un-declares-mali-ebola-free/6024892

The Malian government and the United Nations have declared Mali free of Ebola after 42 days without any new cases of the deadly virus.

Health Minister Ousmane Kone said no confirmed cases had been registered since December 6 when the last Ebola patient had tested negative.

In accordance with World Health Organisation recommendations, the spread of the Ebola virus could be declared over after 42 days without any new cases being recorded, he said in a separate statement.

Mr Kone saluted the Malian authorities and the different players in the anti-Ebola fight for weeks of intense work that led to the result.

He also praised Mali’s health workers and the country’s partners for their efforts while urging that basic hygiene and protective behaviour measures be kept up.

Seven people died of Ebola in Mali.

The first fatality in October was a two-year-old girl brought from neighbouring Guinea to stay with relatives.

Shortly afterwards, a Muslim cleric, also from Guinea, died in the capital Bamako.

He transmitted the virus, directly or indirectly, to seven other people, five of whom died.

The last patient to be treated for Ebola in Mali made a full recovery and was discharged from hospital in early December.

Countries must report no new cases for 42 days – or two incubation periods of 21 days – to be declared Ebola-free.

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