The Health News – 20 January 2016

Overview:
• More than a dozen medical graduates will complete their internship at Tamworth Hospital this year. The Hospital’s General Manager, Catherine Death, said a big part of keeping the interns in Tamworth long-term was making sure all training could happen locally.

• Concerns were raised in the state’s far west this week following a series of days where the temperature rose above 40 degrees in parts of the region. The Department of Family and Community Services said it was reviewing the policy, but in a statement said it would be “inappropriate to speculate” on when the review might be finished.

• University of Canberra researcher Roopika Sodhi is looking for volunteer research participants to take part in a 26-week study assessing changes in their pain and disability when undertaking a course in Pilates.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th January 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-19/push-for-tamworth-retain-regional-medical-graduates/7097408

Hundreds of medical graduates start their year-long internships in hospitals across New South Wales, and in Tamworth the push is on to ensure they complete all of their training in the town’s newly redeveloped hospital.

More than a dozen medical graduates will complete their internship at Tamworth Hospital this year.

The Hospital’s General Manager, Catherine Death, said a big part of keeping the interns in Tamworth long-term was making sure all training could happen locally.

“We have a state-of-the-art hospital now, a brand new hospital, so that gives interns access to state-of-the-art technology, and access to the consultants,” she said.

“We’re hoping with that support over the next two years they will continue to consolidate into their specialties here.

She said there were also opportunities to continue training to the next level.

Retention of doctors and specialists is an issue affecting many regional areas across New South Wales.

In the past, doctors training in some specialty areas have been required to complete training in bigger hospitals but Ms Death said there were negotiations underway to allow all training to happen in Tamworth.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-19/inappropriate-to-speculate-on-aircon-review-timing/7097308

The NSW government says it is too early to know when a review into the policy of not providing air-conditioning in public housing properties will be completed.

Concerns were raised in the state’s far west this week following a series of days where the temperature rose above 40 degrees in parts of the region.

The Department of Family and Community Services said it was reviewing the policy, but in a statement said it would be “inappropriate to speculate” on when the review might be finished.

The department’s far west district manager Glynis Inghram said in the meantime, public housing tenants should look for other ways to keep cool.

“Some of the things that other people do is to have misting fans that they might have on their verandas,” Ms Inghram said.

“Other people might have developed a way of shading their houses in different ways.

William Bates, who lives in the town of Wilcannia, told the ABC he was concerned that residents of Aboriginal Housing Office properties could experience health issues because of the lack of cooling.

Julie Bugmy lives in public housing in Broken Hill, west of Wilcannia, that is not air-conditioned but owns a portable unit that she uses on hot days.

She said her extended family, including two young children who also live in public housing, had to gather around the portable air-conditioner for the duration of last week’s heatwave.

But Ms Bugmy said many Aboriginal Housing Office residents would not be able to afford to purchase a portable air-conditioner.

Ms Inghram said public housing tenants who could afford air-conditioning should consider whether they’re eligible to leave the system.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-18/chronic-low-back-pain-sufferers-wanted-for-pilates-study/7094922

[People from Canberra] suffering with chronic, non-specific, lower back pain are being called on to take part in a new study assessing the long term benefits of Pilates as a form of ongoing treatment.

Figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveal 70 to 90 per cent of Australians will suffer lower back pain at some point in their lives.

University of Canberra researcher Roopika Sodhi said for many, chronic back pain could be utterly debilitating.

The master of physiotherapy student is looking for volunteer research participants to take part in a 26-week study assessing changes in their pain and disability when undertaking a course in Pilates.

“Chronic lower back pain is the largest cause of disability in Australia, accounting for a lot of lost productivity with people taking time off work to manage the pain,” Ms Sodhi said.

“Rehabilitation for lower back pain can take many forms and exercise therapy is the first line of treatment.

“Pilates may offer particular benefits to people with chronic lower back pain because of its focus on core stability as well as body awareness and posture.”

Participants will undergo 12 weeks of Pilates treatment, after which their condition will be monitored for a further 14 weeks.

Treatment will include stretching, strengthening and core stability exercises under the guidance of accredited Pilates instructors.

Pilates has been popularised in recent years as a fitness program.

Ms Sodhi said the methods were often also used in rehabilitating musculoskeletal injuries and conditions.

Canberra residents interested in participating can contact Ms Sodhi by email: [email protected]