The Health News – 22 September 2015


Overview:
• A fire believed to have been deliberately lit at the historic Greenmount hospital near Perth is being investigated by Arson Squad officers. Fire crews were called to the old Undercliffe Hospital and Nursing Home on Coongan Avenue, more than 20 kilometres east of Perth, just before 9:00pm on Thursday night.

• A new resource kit featuring kitchen items called “iRemember in the kitchen” has been developed for Tasmanians living with dementia, to help them better connect with their memories. The case was made possible through a partnership between the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre at the University of Tasmania (UTAS) and the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG).

• India’s prime minister Narendra Modi went into his election campaign vowing to eradicate defecation in public by 2019. But as Alys Francis reports from New Delhi, providing the facilities has yet to change the culture.
News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 22nd September 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-18/arson-squad-officers-investigate-old-greenmount-hospital-fire/6787942

A fire believed to have been deliberately lit at the historic Greenmount hospital near Perth is being investigated by Arson Squad officers.

Fire crews were called to the old Undercliffe Hospital and Nursing Home on Coongan Avenue, more than 20 kilometres east of Perth, just before 9:00pm on Thursday night.

They found the disused building well alight.

Police said fire units from nine stations were required to extinguish the blaze and protect the residents of a neighbouring aged care facility.

The blaze caused significant damage to the old hospital.

Firefighters said the damage bill was expected to be quite high, despite the buildings being derelict.

Police said Arson Squad detectives have attended the site as part of their investigation.

Anyone with information about the fire has been urged to contact Crime Stoppers

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-21/dementia-help-vintage-kitchen-items-tucked-in-new-iremember-kits/6791182

A new resource kit featuring kitchen items has been developed for Tasmanians living with dementia, to help them better connect with their memories.

The “iRemember in the kitchen” case was made possible through a partnership between the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre at the University of Tasmania (UTAS) and the

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG).

Experts estimate as many as 300,000 Australians are living with dementia— including 10,000 Tasmanians— but diagnosis difficulties could mean the exact figure [c]ould swell to almost 1 million.

The resource kit was launched at the beginning of Dementia Awareness Month, which runs until the end of September.

The kit is available for a two-week loan to families, friends and carers of those living with dementia.

UTAS dementia studies Professor Fran McInerney said the objects were carefully chosen to trigger memories and connect people to their past.

“One of the principle features of dementia is memory impairment—people with dementia have difficulty laying down new memories but they have much more facility in retrieving old memories,” she said.

The kitchen case contains household items such as jars, tins, bottles, egg beater, grater, tea cosy, toaster, salt shaker and scone cutters.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-17/delhi-resident-doctor/6785346

India’s prime minister went into his election campaign vowing to eradicate defecation in public by 2019. But as Alys Francis reports from New Delhi, providing the facilities has yet to change the culture.

Tania Kumari did not eat last night after spending the day throwing up.

She keeps her skinny arms clamped in her lap as she is examined in a mobile health clinic next to Sanjay slum, wedged between the Nigerian and Singaporean embassies in India’s capital.

“This is a typical case,” Dr Rupesh Dalavi of the NGO Smile Foundation said, gesturing towards the six-year-old.

Infections causing vomiting are common and they are linked to bad sanitation.

In under a decade, the Sanjay slum’s population has doubled to 6000.

The brick huts rapidly multiply, but there is no space for toilets, and the community block does not meet the demand.

“What’s here is inadequate, so people go in the open, they go to the railway tracks,” community leader Sanjay Singh said.

It is a common problem in India, where more than half the population of 1.3 billion defecate outdoors.

It is the main reason India has the world’s highest number of diarrhoeal deaths in children under five.

India’s prime minister Narendra Modi has recognised open defecation as a major roadblock to development and vowed to wipe it out by 2019 as a tribute to Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birthday.

Mr Modi launched the $44 billion Swachh Bharat (Clean India) program last October, aiming to build more than 110 million toilets. Almost five million were installed last financial year.

But critics fear the mission is in danger of going the same way as past sanitation programs that largely failed.

India’s 2011 census revealed more mobile phones than toilets. And some of those that have been built were reportedly being used to store grain.

NGOs say the program is too focused on constructing toilets, with a 12,000-rupee ($255) household subsidy, and undervalues sanitary education.

But in rural India many do not see the need for toilets.

When the Research Institute for Compassionate Economics (RICE) surveyed villages in 2014 it found that of the 43 per cent of homes that had a toilet, 25 per cent of men and 17 per cent of women still defecated outside.

In many parts of India the practice is socially acceptable.

Behavioural change has been in the government’s sanitation plans since 1999. But a UNICEF official said there was no follow-up, meaning many who receive toilets neither want them nor understand the health benefits.

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