The Health News – 23 October 2015

Overview:
• The Australian Medical Association (AMA) has warned at-home doctor visits could provide a sub par service for patients. South Australian companies have started to offer at-home visits for patients who are unable to travel to their local surgeries during business hours.

• The University of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute has discovered a way to repair “bad” or “damaged” eggs to make them “good” again. The research team has since been able to take a broken egg and mend it by adding haemoglobin. Fertility Society of Australia president Professor Michael Chapman said the research was promising.

• Beloved children’s television show Sesame Street has debuted its first character with autism, Julia, in a bid to raise greater awareness of the common neurodevelopmental condition.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 23rd October 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-22/adelaide-doctors-offer-after-hours-bulk-bill-home-calls/6876098

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) has warned at-home doctor visits could provide a sub par service for patients.

South Australian companies have started to offer at-home visits for patients who are unable to travel to their local surgeries during business hours.

Medvisit director and owner Asim Shehzad told891 ABC Adelaide’s Breakfast program the Medicare-covered at-home visits provided a much needed service to patients.

“The service basically complements the normal, daytime GPs of the patient,” Mr Shehzad said.

Medvisit’s doctors can provide at-home visits between 6pm and 8am, Monday to Friday, and on weekends from noon Saturday.

Mr Shehzad said the hours would complement and not compete with the standard opening hours of surgeries.

He said most patients would normally go to an emergency department for after-hours problems, which could cost the health department up to four times more than an on-call doctor.

The service will be bulk-billed, wholly covered by Medicare or Veterans Affairs, and doctors can also provide initial medication supplies.

People not covered by health services — such as overseas visitors — would be charged $180 for emergency appointments before 11pm and $200 after.

Mr Shehzad said no one had been charged a fee as yet, as all visits to date had been covered by the Medicare or Veterans Affairs systems.

Call-outs are triaged for patients, with urgent callouts attracting $180 to $200 bulk-billed fees, and non-urgent calls, if attended, incurring a lower $40 bulkbilled amount.

Mr Shehzad said doctors’ notes would be sent to the patient’s regular doctor the following day, and the service was not meant to replace regular doctor-patient relationships.

AMA South Australia president Dr Janice Fletcher said the at-home service would not compare with regular surgery appointments.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-22/scientists-discover-how-to-repair-damaged-eggs/6876864

Adelaide researchers have discovered a way to improve the chances of a woman becoming pregnant later in life.

The University of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute has discovered a way to repair “bad” or “damaged” eggs to make them “good” again.

Dr Hannah Brown started the research project in 2012 to try to understand more about the differences between good and bad eggs.

“We looked inside eggs and we found haemoglobin, which is the protein or the thing that’s inside red blood cells that makes them red,” she said.

“But also we found they’re on the inside [of] eggs that we use to make a baby.”

Dr Brown said the haemoglobin was present at very high levels in good eggs but it was missing from bad eggs.

“When we looked at those bad eggs — we knew that there was lots of things, there are lots of ways that your eggs can get bad or broken and we thought, well perhaps [haemoglobin] playing some

important role that’s missing in bad eggs,” she said.

“What we did was add it back to those bad eggs and make them function more efficiently.

“We were really excited by that outcome.”

The research team has since been able to take a broken egg and mend it by adding haemoglobin.

Fertility Society of Australia president Professor Michael Chapman said the research was promising.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-22/sesame-street-debuts-new-character-with-autism-julia/6876000

Beloved children’s television show Sesame Street has debuted its first character with autism, Julia, in a bid to raise greater awareness of the common neurodevelopmental condition.

The red-haired, green-eyed muppet was introduced to the gang on Wednesday as part of the launch of the show’s new online initiative,Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in all Children.

Appearing alongside favourites Elmo and Abby, Julia features in the initiative’s interactive storybook and various online resources, which educate children on how to identify and respond to common behaviours associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).


The initiative also provides tips for parents of children with autism and advice for how people in the wider community can approach caretakers.

In an interview with People, Sesame Workshop’s Sherrie Westin highlighted the need for empathy.

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