The Health News – 25 February 2016

Overview:
• Gift of Life’s DonateLife Walk has become an institution in Canberra, and in its 10th year more than 5,700 people flocked to Lake Burley Griffin to raise awareness and support for organ and tissue donation.

• Emergency defibrillators are to be installed in public buildings in Adelaide’s city centre in a 12-month trial supported by Adelaide City Council and is being backed by the SA Ambulance Service as well as the Heart Foundation and St Johns Ambulance.

• We all know that when we don’t sleep enough, the following day will be painful. A new study by the US Centre for Disease Control which has found that the detrimental impacts of sleep deprivation go well beyond what’s commonly understood.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 25th February 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-24/gift-of-life-donatelife-walk-marks-10-years/7195270

Gift of Life’s DonateLife Walk has become an institution in Canberra, and in its 10th year more than 5,700 people flocked to Lake Burley Griffin to raise awareness and support for organ and tissue donation.

Australia’s donation and transplantation activity reached its highest level last year with a rate of 21.2 donors per million people.

Canberra now sits above the national average of 18.3 donors per million.

Gift of Life president David O’Leary said the annual walk aimed to start the conversation about donation in the community.

Mr O’Leary said in cases where people had registered their intentions to become an organ or tissue donor, 92 per cent of families gave consent.

DonateLife Walk founder Anne Cahill Lambert has stepped back from her role as main organiser of the event but continues to take part each year.

She started the walk after she was diagnosed with … a rare lung condition — 12 years ago and was placed on a transplant waiting list.

Before her diagnosis, she said she knew very little about organ donation and was surprised to find she was not alone.

For more information on organ and tissue donation, visit the Organ and Tissue Authority.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-24/adelaide-to-trial-defibrillators-in-public-buildings/7194698

Emergency defibrillators are to be installed in public buildings in Adelaide’s city centre in a 12-month trial.

The trial was supported by Adelaide City Council last …and is being backed by the SA Ambulance Service as well as the Heart Foundation and St Johns Ambulance.

The council voted to buy defibrillators to be installed in buildings which it owns.

Councillor Phil Martin said the portable defibrillators could easily be operated in a cardiac emergency by a person with no medical training.

He said the trial would also determine how many defibrillators were already available in private businesses in the CBD.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-24/knight-were-not-sleeping-enough-and-its-literally-killing-us/7196576

We all know that when we don’t sleep enough, the following day will be painful. But alarming new research confirms that’s not where the repercussions end…

We don’t sleep enough. Our doctors tell us this, assorted lifestyle gurus tell us this, and our bodies tell us this every time we wake up feeling like our heads have been gently bludgeoned with a fence paling.

But instead of heeding the message and retreating to slumberland, with earplugs, eye masks … we struggle on.

Resisting healthy sleep has become our daily norm. We are woken not by the sun at the time that suits our biorhythm, but by the remorseless bleeping of gadgets. On the way to work, caffeinated drinks jolt our sluggish brains into action. On the way home, electronic devices interrupt us with supposedly urgent messages, preventing us from shifting our minds away from the workplace.

Sleep is invariably our lowest priority.

And all the while, there’s society’s constant pressure to earn, succeed, compete and provide. Making rent or mortgage repayments, balancing budgets, planning for the future – it’s stressful and exhausting.

Our sleep debts pile up at casino loan shark rates, and if we don’t pay them back, the punishment is no less disturbingly physical. That’s the main lesson from a new study by the US Centre for Disease Control which has found that the detrimental impacts of sleep deprivation go well beyond what’s commonly understood.

…according to the CDC’s extensive study, …Sleeping fewer than seven hours… increases your risk for “obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, stroke, frequent mental distress, and all-cause mortality”. And if that’s not disturbing enough, it also “impairs cognitive performance, which can increase the likelihood of motor vehicle and other transportation accidents, industrial accidents, medical errors, and loss of work productivity that could affect the wider community”.

Sleep deprivation is a form of torture, routinely practiced at Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib. Most of the time, though, we’re doing it to ourselves.