The Health News – 26 January 2016

Overview:
• Australia Medical Association of Queensland Council of General Practice chair Richard Kidd warned people to stay cool and hydrated on Australia Day because almost a quarter of Australia’s heat stress deaths occur following the national day. #HeatStress #AustraliaDay

• ‘Anti-vaxxers’ who feel they will be judged for their decision are keeping it a secret, putting others at greater risk, according to Edith Cowan University school of psychology and social science researchers. #AntiVaxxer

• Most of us don’t have oodles of spare time idly waiting to be put to good use. So finding time to focus on your goals will likely involve some hard choices about what to prioritise.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 26th January 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-25/heat-stress-deaths-rise-following-australia-day/7113030

A Queensland doctor has warned people to stay cool and hydrated on Australia Day because almost a quarter of Australia’s heat stress deaths occur following the national day.

Australia Medical Association of Queensland Council of General Practice chair Richard Kidd, based in Brisbane, said more than 500 people died of heat stress in Australia each year. 

“About 22 per cent of all of the heat stress deaths happen on January 27th each year,” Dr Kidd said. 

“It’s not that well known, but heat stress kills more Australians than all of the other natural disasters put together.

“Floods, fires, cyclones — if you add them all up, still more Australians die of heat stress each year.”

Dr Kidd said people of all ages could suffer from heat stress, but the elderly were vulnerable, particularly if they had pre-existing medical issues.

They could die from a heart attack or kidney failure as a result of heat stress.

“Everyone enjoys Australia Day. It’s the day you might go out and play cricket in the boiling hot sun, and then you might go and cook up something on the barbecue, a few shrimps or whatever while you’re drinking some wine and beer,” Dr Kidd said.

“Unfortunately that is all a pretty lethal combination when you have a heatwave.

“That’s why a lot of people die after Australia Day, because the damage happens on Australia Day but it takes 12 to 24 hours to actually kill you.”

Dr Kidd advised staying heat smart by drinking small sips of water frequently, using air conditioning or opening up windows, and avoiding going out into the heat between 11am and 2pm. 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-25/’anti-vaxxers’-hiding-their-decision-amplifying-risk-to-others/7112416

‘Anti-vaxxers’ who feel they will be judged for their decision are keeping it a secret, putting others at greater risk, a new study suggests.

Edith Cowan University school of psychology and social science researchers said the study showed the health of pregnant women and newborns was at risk from parents who refused to be honest about their decision not to vaccinate their children.

Lead researcher Dr Bronwyn Harman told The Guardian it was important to understand the reasons parents were not vaccinating their children.

“It really does frighten me a lot if people coming into contact with those women and children aren’t disclosing their status out of fear of being perceived as bad parents,” she said.

Early results from the study indicate reasons included a mistaken belief a healthy diet alone could protect their children as well as herd immunity.

But mainly, feelings of manipulation by governments was driving under-vaccination, Dr Harman said.

Australian Childhood Immunisation Register data shows as at September 30 last year 93 per cent of children aged 12 to 15 months were fully immunised. For children aged two years to 27 months, the rate dropped to 90.4 per cent.

An Australian study published in journal Vaccine last year found that of the infants incompletely immunised, just 16 per cent had mothers who disagreed with immunisation.

Australian Medical Association (AMA) vice president Dr Stephen Parnis said it remained a source of “immense frustration” some parents chose not to vaccinate their children.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-25/how-to-say-no/7111800

Most of us don’t have oodles of spare time idly waiting to be put to good use. So finding time to focus on your goals will likely involve some hard choices about what to prioritise.

Of all the things you need to do today, “you should be asking yourself which ones are going to make a real difference and which can go on the backburner,” says clinical and health psychologist Dr Bob Montgomery.

“A really important part of sticking to your goals is sticking to the ones that are really going to make a difference and not giving into the ones that might be easy or appealing or entertaining, but aren’t going to do as much good.”

That often means turning down tasks, activities and demands from others – a challenge many of us find difficult.

Dr Bob’s top 3 tips for saying ‘no’

  1. Refuse the request clearly, nondefensively and promptly;
  2. If you want time to think about a request, say so;
  3. Keep eye contact and speak clearly and audibly.

 

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