The Health News – 26 October 2015

Overview:
• Fertility clinics in South Australia say they are struggling to keep up with an increasing demand for donor sperm. The rising infertility rates along with a greater number of same-sex couples and single women requesting treatments have contributed to the shortage in donated sperm supplies.

• An increasing number of women in Australia and overseas are taking up the opportunity of freezing their eggs to be used later, as a kind of motherhood insurance. One of the world’s leading IVF researchers, Lord Professor Robert Winston, says women are being given false hope. He believes that women are being deceived.

• South Australians are being warned to take care when using home rotisseries or spits after they were linked to more than 20 people falling ill last financial year. SA Health director said ensuring the meat had been fully cooked through was essential in preventing salmonella.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 26th October 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-24/sa-fertility-clinics-importing-sperm-as-donor-demand-surges/6882010

Fertility clinics in South Australia say they are struggling to keep up with an increasing demand for donor sperm.

They said rising infertility rates along with a greater number of same-sex couples and single women requesting treatments have contributed to the shortage in donated sperm supplies.

Repromed Fertility Specialists general manager Dr Hamish Hamilton said more sperm donors are needed, but numbers had been steadily declining over the past decade.


Dr Hamilton said the increase in demand at Repromed could also be attributed to a greater number of women looking to start a family later in life.

Flinders Fertility Director of Clinical Services, Dr Michael McEvoy, said infertility rates in males were also on the rise.

In South Australia, one donor can be used to help up to 10 families have children.

Depleted sperm stocks in South Australia have forced an increasing number of clinics [to] look abroad for donor sperm.

Dr McEvoy said Flinders Fertility had been importing donations from the European Sperm Bank in a bid to keep up with the demand.

Repromed and Flinders Fertility said greater public awareness and knowledge of sperm donation was needed to boost donor numbers.

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/backgroundbriefing/cold-comfort-is-the-fertility-industry-misleading-women/6873442

An increasing number of women in Australia and overseas are taking up the opportunity of freezing their eggs to be used later, as a kind of motherhood insurance.

But some doctors are warning that these women, mainly in their thirties, are being misled, and being encouraged to freeze their eggs when there is little chance of success.

One of the world’s leading IVF researchers, Lord Professor Robert Winston, says women are being given false hope.

At an information session organised by Melbourne IVF—one of the city’s largest clinics—a speaker cautions that the treatment is costly.

‘The cost is just under $10,000. It’s not cheap, but when we think about all those other things we spend a lot of money on it is something that most of my patients say to me they think it was a very worthwhile investment,’ the speaker says.

Professor Winston led the team that pioneered IVF treatment in the UK. He’s become outraged about the way his peers have touted the success of egg freezing.
‘If you measure success by the eggs which look normal down a microscope, or which fertilize, that is of no help to the patient or to the woman who wants to have a baby,’ he says.
‘The key thing that she wants is a live birth of a healthy baby. She doesn’t want a thawed egg, she doesn’t want a fertilized egg, and she certainly doesn’t want a miscarriage.’
He believes that women are being deceived.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-25/south-australians-warned-of-salmonella-outbreak/6883050

South Australians are being warned to take care when using home rotisseries or spits after they were linked to more than 20 people falling ill last financial year.

“The use of home rotisseries and spits is becoming increasingly common across the state as a fun way to feed large groups, especially with the weather warming up and people wanting to cook outside,” Mr Snelling said.

“What many people don’t realise is there are a number of important steps people must take to avoid making people sick if they are planning to cook a large animal.

“Proper storage, including hygiene and refrigeration are vital so that dangerous bacteria do not get the chance to multiply …

“If you don’t have an appropriate place to safely store a whole animal we advise that you pick the raw meat up from the butcher or supermarket as close to preparation time as possible.”

SA Health director … said ensuring the meat had been fully cooked through was essential in preventing salmonella.

She said the best way to ensure meat was cooked through was to place a thermometer into the thickest part of the meat to measure the temperature.

“Meat, particularly poultry, needs to reach a temperature of 75 degrees Celsius to be completely safe,” she said.

Throughout 2014-15 more than 200 people reported falling ill as a result of salmonella outbreaks.

Salmonella can be a serious infection and usually results from ingestion of the bacteria from contaminated food, water or hands.

Symptoms include fever, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, headache, stomach cramps, and nausea and vomiting.

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