The Health News – 28 September 2015

Overview:
• The Garvan Institure has signed a memorandum of understanding with Genomics England, the organisation established by the UK’s Department of Health to deliver the world-first 100,000 Genomes Project. The two organisations will share resources and expertise to advance genomic medicine in Australia and the UK.

•  There are hopes a new centre for homeless fathers in Tasmania’s south will help fathers stay connected with their children.The State Government has pledged $2.5 million towards a purpose-built $4 million centre to house men and their children. The facility in the Hobart suburb of Moonah will be a first for the state and forms part of the Government’s affordable housing strategy.

• More restrictions could be placed on a range of medical tests and procedures subsidised by Medicare, with the Federal Government carrying out a “spring clean” of the entire system. Health Minister Sussan Ley has commissioned a review of the 5,700 of medical services subsidised under the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS).

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 28th September 2015. Read by Wayne Bucklar.

http://www.garvan.org.au/news-events/news/garvan-partners-with-genomics-england

Garvan has signed a memorandum of understanding with Genomics England, the organisation established by the UK’s Department of Health to deliver the world-first 100,000 Genomes Project.

The two organisations will share resources and expertise to advance genomic medicine in Australia and the UK.

The 100,000 Genomes Project will sequence genomes from around 70,000 National Health Service (NHS) patients, focusing on individuals with rare diseases or cancer. Through the project,

Genomics England aims to bring benefit to patients, build capability in the burgeoning area of genomic medicine, and advance medical research.

Professor John Mattick, Executive Director of Garvan, says that partnering with Genomics England is an important step in the development of Australia’s genomics capacity.

As one of Australia’s leading medical research institutions, Garvan develops research programs that combine leading-edge science with clinical outcomes. In 2012, Garvan established the

Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics (KCCG), the largest sequencing centre in the southern hemisphere. KCCG is undertaking research and developing innovative analytical pipelines to advance the use of whole-genome sequencing in clinical diagnosis and patient care.
ENDS

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-27/tasmanian-first-centre-for-homeless-fathers-building-blocks/6806404

There are hopes a new centre for homeless fathers in Tasmania’s south will help fathers stay connected with their children.

The State Government has pledged $2.5 million towards a purpose-built $4 million centre to house men and their children.

The facility in the Hobart suburb of Moonah will be a first for the state and forms part of the Government’s affordable housing strategy.

Selvin Aragon, 39, and his young son found themselves homeless in the middle of Hobart’s coldest winter in decades.

“That’s what hit [my son] hard: we had no car, we had to do a lot of walking, so it was really cold; we had to walk a lot of distance, from one place to another, ” he said.

After a month of hotel rooms, couch-surfing and running between service providers, money was running out.

Nearly 23,000 families in Tasmania are single-parent households, and almost one-in-five are single fathers.

The Hobart City Mission’s chief executive John Stubley said there was a greater awareness.

“We’re now talking about it much like family violence, it’s always been there but it hasn’t been identified,” he said.

Construction will begin next year on the new Moonah centre, known as Building Blocks.

City Mission will run the centre which will house up to seven fathers and their children, and will include disability access accommodation.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-27/medicare-review-to-target-unnecessary-invasive-procedures/6807482

More restrictions could be placed on a range of medical tests and procedures subsidised by Medicare, with the Federal Government carrying out a “spring clean” of the entire system.

There is concern that invasive procedures such as knee arthroscopies and tonsillectomies are being ordered unnecessarily or for the wrong people.

Health Minister Sussan Ley has commissioned a review of the 5,700 of medical services subsidised under the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS).

“There are examples that see too many procedures for a particular cohort of patients with little evidence of benefit,” Ms Ley said.

“The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care has, for example, drawn our attention to knee arthroscopy — examination of the knee joint.

Labor’s health spokeswoman Catherine King said the review was another attack on the health system by the Coalition.

“The Government is going about this like a bull in a china shop,” Ms King said.

The review began earlier this year and is being carried out by working groups of doctors and medical experts across the country.

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