The Health News – 29 May 2014

Overview

  • A woman whose heart stopped beating in the surf at a popular Sydney beach has lent her support to a new drive to train more CPR responders.
  • A prominent health analyst says it would make more sense to put the money raised from Medicare co-payments directly into medical research now, rather than putting it into an endowment fund.
  • HEALTH Minister Peter Dutton has defended his proposed $20 billion research fund, after a government MP said the policy was “foolish” and reflected an “incoherent” approach to science.
  • CSIRO is closing several research sites, including relocating world-renowned climate research from its long standing atmospheric laboratory in Victoria, following the federal government’s budget cuts.


The news on Health Professional Radio.  Today is the 29TH May 2014. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-28/death-by-cardiac-arrest-can-be-avoided/5483546

A woman whose heart stopped beating in the surf at a popular Sydney beach has lent her support to a new drive to train more CPR responders.

Cassandra Scott was out in the surf at Coogee beach 18 months ago when another swimmer found her floating face down.

Dragged back to the sand, four total strangers spent the next 15 minutes frantically at work.

Ms Scott was one of the lucky ones.

According to estimates, 20,000 to 30,000 Australians die from cardiac arrest every year.

New organisation Take Heart Australia is now hoping to improve the nation’s cardiac arrest survival rate.

The group is headed by associate professor Paul Middleton, an emergency medicine expert who divides his time between research, teaching and frontline work at Sydney’s Manly Hospital.

“Every single person has the tools to save a life at the end of their arms, basically,” he said.

“If we can get 50 per cent of our population trained in CPR, at recognising cardiac arrest, and we have defibrillators everywhere that are linked to the triple-0 number so that operators know where they are as, well, I think we will save thousands of lives in Australia.”

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-28/medical-research-funds-should-be-paid-now-says-analyst/5484394

A prominent health analyst says it would make more sense to put the money raised from Medicare co-payments directly into medical research now, rather than putting it into an endowment fund.

The Government’s solution is the medical research future fund, bankrolled by billions in health care savings like the Medicare co-payment, hospital budget savings and fee increases.

The fund will grow to $20 billion, generating $1 billion in annual income by 2022, with that money distributed to support medical research.

This year the Government will tip $1 billion in savings into the fund for a payout of just $20 million.

The Grattan Institute think tank says medical research would benefit more if the Government ditched the fund and simply allocated the billion dollars in savings now, instead of waiting for eight years until the fund has grown.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/liberal-mp-dennis-jensen-blasts-foolish-coalition-science-policy/story-fn59niix-1226934205120#

HEALTH Minister Peter Dutton has defended his proposed $20 billion research fund, after a government MP said the policy was “foolish” and reflected an “incoherent” approach to science.

Liberal stalwart Dennis Jensen, a former research scientist and defence analyst, has lashed the decision to establish the fund while cutting spending on scientific agencies such as CSIRO.

http://www.theage.com.au/technology/sci-tech/csiro-closes-sites-and-cuts-research-as-result-of-budget-20140527-zrq1h.html

CSIRO is closing several research sites, including relocating world-renowned climate research from its long standing atmospheric laboratory in Victoria, following the federal government’s budget cuts.

An annual direction statement, written by CSIRO chief executive Megan Clark and obtained by the organisation’s staff association, details significant internal changes to research as CSIRO enacts the cuts and offsets lower expected commercial revenue.

The organisation will cut key research areas such as geothermal energy, marine biodiversity, liquid fuels and radio astronomy and close eight sites across the country.

The federal government cut CSIRO’s funding by $111 million over four years, which will result in 500 job cuts at the nation’s peak scientific organisation.

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