The Health News – 5 April 2016

Overview:
• An issues paper prepared by Consumer Affairs Victoria noted smoke drift was commonly raised as an issue with owners corporations. Dr Sarah White, director of Quit Victoria, said smoke drift was passive smoke that floated into another person’s personal space.

• Fly fishing has been embraced as a way to help women recovering from breast cancer treatment. A group called Casting for Recovery has formed to offer retreats for women at various stages of treatment.

• A new Adelaide eye clinic at Flinders University in Adelaide’s southern suburbs, is dedicated to treating people with autism and making them feel comfortable with the examination experience.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  5th of April 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-04/allow-smoking-bans-in-apartment-blocks-says-quit-victoria/7296794

Quit Victoria says owners’ corporations in apartment buildings should be able to ban residents from smoking at home.

The comments come as a Victorian Government review into consumer property law raised the issue of “smoke drift” within apartment blocks.

An issues paper prepared by Consumer Affairs Victoria noted smoke drift was commonly raised as an issue with owners corporations.

Dr Sarah White, director of Quit Victoria, said smoke drift was passive smoke that floated into another person’s personal space.

Dr White said owners corporations currently had no way to resolve residents’ disputes about cigarette smoke.

The Consumer Affairs Victoria paper gave the example of an apartment building where cigarette smoke circulated through air-conditioning systems into the homes of non-smokers.

The paper raised the idea of legislating new “model rules” governing cigarette smoking that could be adopted by owners corporations.

She said the idea of owners corporations banning smoking within apartment blocks was “not a completely out-of-the-blue proposition”.

“We have owners corporation rules that determine a lot of the things that we do — from the colour we paint our houses to where we put air conditioners,” she said.

The smoking question was just one of many issues floated by the Consumer Property Law Review, which was announced by Minister Jane Garrett last year.

The issues paper was the second to be released by the review and focused on the Owners Corporation Act 2006.

The paper asked whether new model rules were needed regarding pets and whether residents should be liable for the actions of their guests.

Other issues raised in the paper regarded the powers and responsibilities of owners corporations and their governance and management.

The issues paper is open for public comment until April 29.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-04/fly-fishing-offers-escape-for-women-with-breast-cancer/7295728

Fly fishing has been embraced as a way to help women recovering from breast cancer treatment.

A group called Casting for Recovery has formed to offer retreats for women at various stages of treatment.

Already popular among cancer support groups in Canada and the United States, the first fly fishing retreat for Australian breast cancer patients took place over the weekend just outside of Canberra.

Cancer survivor Andrea Balthazaar said she found the experience almost meditative.

The action of fly casting is considered beneficial for upper body flexibility after surgery, and many people also find the nature-based pastime to be soothing and relaxing.

Paired with experienced fly fishers, the women learn how to cast, make and tie a fly, and set up their rods and lines.

But it is not all about landing the big one.

The retreats offer women a chance to get away from their daily concerns and meet others who have been through similar experiences.

For some women, the retreat has offered a welcome break from dealing with anxious friends and family.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-04/autism-eye-clinic-adelaide/7295348

A new Adelaide eye clinic is dedicated to treating people with autism and making them feel comfortable with the examination experience.

Adelaide mother Jane Burford said simple tasks such as going for an eye test could prove overwhelming for children such as her eight-year-old son Ned.

“Often when I take Ned to places we have to prepare and tell him ahead of time where we’re going so he doesn’t get anxious about it,” she said.

The clinic, at Flinders University in Adelaide’s southern suburbs, is carefully designed to cater for such needs.

“They actually send you a video so you can take a virtual tour of the place,” Ms Burford explained.

“I showed him that and by the time we got here he was very comfortable.”

Optometrist Paul Constable said eye issues were common in children with autism but went undiagnosed in up to 40 per cent of cases.

Dr Constable said correcting an autistic child’s vision could be life-changing for them.

The clinic’s resources include a visual timetable explaining how the appointment will work, and Dr Constable uses a high-tech auto-refractor to be able to test someone’s eyes without having to get too close to them, or ask too many questions.

The inspiration for the new clinic was born of Dr Constable’s personal experience.

“My child has autism and, as an optometrist, I really didn’t know where to go when he was diagnosed,” he said.

“A lot of the issues I faced I think a lot of other parents would face.”

Consultations at the clinic are fully covered by Medicare.

 

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