The Health News – 7 April 2016

Overview:
• Remote health agency CRANAplus says a national committee to support the safety of outback health workers will be set up with the Federal Government’s support, in response to the death of South Australian nurse Gayle Woodford.

• In Question Time, Labor’s health spokeswoman Rebecca White revealed mould had been discovered in 18 out of 64 modules in the temporary building at the Royal Hobart Hospital and the roof needed to be replaced.

• A recent national trial saw 17 Australians with severe asthma undergo bronchial thermoplasty, with many experiencing considerable benefits post-surgery. National Asthma Council Australia chairman Dr Jonathan Burdon said bronchial thermoplasty was a relatively new procedure approved for use in Australia in 2010, and had also been used overseas.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  7th of April 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-06/rural-health-groups-meet-federal-government-about-work-practice/7305244

A national committee to support the safety of outback health workers will be set up with the Federal Government’s support, a lobby group says, in response to the death of South Australian nurse Gayle Woodford.

An urgent meeting with rural health groups was convened at Parliament House by Rural Health Minister Fiona Nash [yesterday].

Ms Woodford’s body was found in a shallow grave and a man has been charged with her murder … in the state’s remote …APY Lands.

She went missing during the night about a fortnight ago and often attended afterhours callouts by herself.

Professor Janie Smith, from remote health agency CRANAplus, said Senator Nash supported its call for a national committee to push for changes to improve safety for health workers.

A petition calling for the abolition of single nurse posts and unaccompanied callouts at night has attracted 115,000 signatures.

Professor Smith said those changes were among the group’s priorities.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-06/royal-hobart-hospital-temporary-building-‘mould-needs-new-roof’/7303940

The temporary building being installed at Royal Hobart Hospital has a growing mould problem and the roof already needs to be replaced, Labor claims.

The $22 million construction at the front entrance of the hospital is designed to house patients while a major block is demolished as part of a redevelopment of the site.

In Question Time, Labor’s health spokeswoman Rebecca White revealed mould had been discovered in 18 out of 64 modules in the temporary building and the roof needed to be replaced.

She questioned when patients would be able to move in, reminding Health Minister Michael Ferguson he had said clinical services would begin to move in by January.

Mr Ferguson assured Tasmanians that no patients would be moved until the building was declared safe but did not say when that would be.

The cost of the repairs required will be covered by the contractor.

Mr Ferguson maintained the hospital’s overall redevelopment was on track to be complete by the end of 2018.

He also accused Ms White of attempting to disguise herself as a union official in order to inspect the building.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-06/bronchial-thermoplasty-may-be-game-changer-for-severe-asthma/7303300

For very severe asthma suffers, everyday life can be tough. Each day can be punctuated by wheezing, breathlessness and chest tightness.

But a promising medical procedure that effectively “burns” the inside of the bronchial tubes to widen the airways could provide much needed relief.

A recent national trial saw 17 Australians with severe asthma undergo bronchial thermoplasty, with many experiencing considerable benefits post-surgery.

The study’s findings were released at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand in Perth this week.

And the results have been cautiously welcomed by the National Asthma Council Australia and Asthma Australia.

National Asthma Council Australia chairman Dr Jonathan Burdon said bronchial thermoplasty was a relatively new procedure approved for use in Australia in 2010, and had also been used overseas.

Bronchial thermoplasty is a day procedure, performed while the patient is sedated. A tube is put through the nose, down the back of the throat into the main windpipe and hot air is blown in.

“It involves burning the inside of the bronchial tubes and disrupting some of the muscle that’s there which may be contributing to wheezing and airway narrowing,” Dr Bowler said.

Dr Bowler said the procedure was fairly expensive.

 

 

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