The Health News – 8 Dec 2014

Overview

  • General practitioners in rural and remote areas will be able to apply for up to $300,000 of Commonwealth funding to build or expand their teaching facilities from today.
  • Yoga can help breast cancer survivors suffering from a painful and common post-treatment condition, a study has found.
  • A landmark study published in The Lancet recommended hospitals change the fluid, as it may be impacting the sodium levels in children’s blood.


News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 8th December 2014. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-06/rural-health-gps-granted-52million-for-teaching-facilities/5948530

General practitioners in rural and remote areas will be able to apply for up to $300,000 of Commonwealth funding to build or expand their teaching facilities from today.

The Federal Government said at least 175 grants will be allocated over the next three years from total funding of $52.5 million.

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) Dennis Pashen said the funding was welcome.

But he said he was “certain” the requirement to match the money from the Government would be a disincentive for some practices.

“Particularly those that are struggling, but often what it would allow would be additional infrastructure in that practice, and it might be that you’ll have a couple of rooms for students and young doctors in there, but it’ll also give you, if you match that money, it’ll give you improved teaching resources locally, and increased space for patients to come in,” he said.

“There are good opportunities there in a lot of ways.”

Federal Opposition spokesman Stephen Jones said Labor provided more than twice that amount for similar infrastructure projects when it was in Government.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-05/study-finds-yoga-helping-women-recover-from-breast-cancer/5945932

Yoga can help breast cancer survivors suffering from a painful and common post-treatment condition, a study has found.

Lovers of yoga have long touted its spiritual and physical benefits, but rarely has the hype been put under scientific scrutiny.

But the ancient Indian exercise is gaining credibility as a modern medicine.

Women who took part in the University of Tasmania study said the practice had helped in their healing process both physically and emotionally and, for some, even changed their lives.

The study found yoga can help breast cancer survivors suffering from a post-surgical condition called lymphoedema, an impairment of the lymphatic system that is often a result of cancer treatments.

Yoga therapist Annette Loudon has looked at whether the ancient practice could offer new hope to sufferers.

The University of Tasmania researcher created a special program for women with lymphoedema, testing 40 participants for eight weeks.

“A really great finding was that their symptoms reduced in comparison to the control group,” she said.

“Symptoms really can be a major detrimental effect of lymphoedema and stop people going about their daily activities in their life, so that was a great finding.”

… personal stories meant as much to Annette Loudon as the measurable results she published.

“One of the ladies said for the first time in 20 years, she could reach her garage door with both arms and when we measured her range of motion it had improved,” she said.

“For another lady, her quality of life improved from a zero to an eight – where 10 is perfect quality of life – so these improvements were wonderful.”

Dr Andrew Williams supervised the study and said it was unlike anything he had been involved with.

Ms Loudon is now training other therapists to deliver her yoga for lymphoedema program and hopes the practice will spread as its therapeutic benefits are better known.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-01/study-recommends-changing-iv-drips-given-to-children/5931346

Every day in hospitals around the world, children are given an intravenous (IV) fluid to help maintain their hydration – a fluid which has been the same since the 1950s.

But a landmark study published in The Lancet recommended hospitals change the fluid, as it may be impacting the sodium levels in childrens’ blood.
In recent years, doctors were concerned children on IV drips were at higher risk of developing a condition which could lead to serious side effects, including brain swelling and even death.

Lead researcher Dr Sarah McNab said the study found that increasing the sodium concentration in IV fluid kept the sodium level in the blood more stable, which in turn prevented these side effects.

The study, conducted by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the Royal Children’s Hospital, was one of the largest and most diverse studies of its kind.

“What we found, was that in increasing the sodium concentration in the fluid, we could keep the sodium level in the blood more stable, which we think will prevent some very serious side effects.”
Dr McNab said hospitals had been administering traditional IV solutions to children for decades.

Dr McNab said there are a number of dangerous side effects reported when rehydrating children with traditional IV fluid.

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