The News – 15 September 2014

Overview

  • The Government has been advised Ms Holden is suing over her termination as head of the Southern Tasmanian Health Organisation.
  • The Heart Foundation has called on all Victorian political parties to make prevention and treatment of heart disease a priority for this November’s state-election, highlighting six areas where the next state government can improve voter’s heart health and reduce hospital admissions.
  • The world’s oldest female competitive hockey player is considering hanging up her boots after playing in a semi-final match in Canberra.


Stories Discussed
News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th September 2014. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-12/former-health-department-head2c-jane-holden2c-sues-government/5738672?section=tas

The Tasmanian Government has vowed to vigorously defend itself against legal action brought by former Royal Hobart Hospital boss Jane Holden.

The Government has been advised Ms Holden is suing over her termination as head of the Southern Tasmanian Health Organisation.

Ms Holden’s position was terminated in June, weeks after a scathing Integrity Commission report accused her of nepotism and misconduct.

She has strongly denied wrongfully employing her husband and friends.

Health Minister Michael Ferguson has maintained the decision to stand down Ms Holden was because of poor performance, not a result of the allegations.

Ms Holden has strongly denied that she breached the code of conduct and is confident she will win the case.

http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/news-media/Media-Releases-2014/Pages/time-prioritise-heart-health-victoria.aspx

The Heart Foundation has called on all Victorian political parties to make prevention and treatment of heart disease a priority for this November’s state-election, highlighting six areas where the next state government can improve voter’s heart health and reduce hospital admissions.

Heart Foundation Victoria CEO Diana Heggie said heart disease is Victoria’s leading cause of premature death and is responsible for too many avoidable hospital admissions.

“Heart disease puts an enormous financial strain on our health system in Victoria with treatment costing hospitals approximately $400 million a year. That’s more than $1 million a day,” Ms Heggie said.

“The next government has the opportunity to help prevent heart disease and improve treatment for the 300,000 Victorians living with the condition.”

The six recommendations are:

1. Introduce a nurse-led early detection and screening program in heart attack hot spots to identify people at risk of heart attack or stroke

2. Boost access to cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention to improve recovery from heart attack

3. Educate Victorians about the warning signs of heart attack

4. Amend the Tobacco Act to make outdoor dining and drinking areas smoke-free

5. Amend the Planning and Environment Act to ensure health is a consideration in urban design

6. Implement mandatory kilojoule labelling at fast food outlets that have 20 or more sites in Victoria or 50 or more nationally.

“More can and should be done to reduce the number of patients who fall through the cracks after hospital treatment.

“Better access to cardiac rehabilitation is crucial, as it boosts recovery and reduces the likelihood that patients will have a secondary event and be readmitted to hospital for further expensive medical treatment.

“With the number of people living with heart disease expected to rise by 36% over the next decade, we need political parties to act now to prevent heart disease and improve treatment for Victorians,” Ms Heggie said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-14/worlds-oldest-female-hockey-player-considers-retirement/5742398

The world’s oldest female competitive hockey player is considering hanging up her boots after playing in a semi-final match in Canberra.

Marie Larsen, 80, played in the right-wing position for the Tuggeranong Vikings hockey team during the game.

She started playing more than 65 years ago at Lismore in northern New South Wales while aged in her teens.

Over her career Ms Larsen has played in most positions and even represented the ACT at a national level.

However, the Guinness World Record holder [stated]… she is not feeling as light on the field as she used to be.

“The bones are getting a little bit creaky, but still I’m all right,” she said.

“You just get in there and do what you have to.”

Ms Larsen plays in the Women’s State League 5 competition, where she joins teammates who are often less than half her age.

She started thinking about retirement after suffering a minor stroke in March this year.

Ms Larsen is still planning to turn up for umpiring duties and to pass on her tips to any juniors in need of advice.

The next oldest competitive female hockey player in the world is 76 years old.

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